Ch 33 - Invertebrates (PART 2 of 2)(1 slide per page)-1

Boom barrens 147 ecological importance coral reef sea

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Unformatted text preview: stotle%27s%20lantern.jpg http://www.chalk.discoveringfossils.co.uk/images/LanternBooth.jpg 144 Ecological Importance Sea urchins = dominant herbivores in many marine ecosystems Kelp forest 145 Ecological Importance Sea urchins = dominant herbivores in many marine ecosystems Kelp forest Sea urchin pop. boom 146 Ecological Importance Sea urchins = dominant herbivores in many marine ecosystems Kelp forest Sea urchin pop. boom Barrens 147 Ecological Importance Coral reef Sea urchin die-off Algal bloom 148 5. Class Holothuroidea: sea cucumbers • No arms • No spines • Microscopic ossicles “whole, worm-like” 149 5. Class Holothuroidea: Feeding • Complete digestive system • Imobile • Suspension feeders / substrate feeders • Mouth surrounded by tentacles (special tube feet) • insert into mouth to remove food 150 5. Class Holothuroidea: Respiration •Breathe through Anus! •Large internal respiratory trees that branch off anus 151 Class Holothuroidea: Defense Some species of coral-reef sea cucumbers defend themselves by expelling parts of their respiratory tree to entangle potential predators (some also expel a toxin) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCxKFc3XtJs Readings on which you will NOT be tested 152 • • • • • • • • • Figure 33.3 – You only need to know the groups discussed in class Figure 33.8 Trematodes and Figure 33.11 Rotifers Brachiopods Figure 33.22 – Impact (Though worth a quick read!) Figure 33.29 – Inquiry Details of Circulatory systems in any of the groups (Is in later chapter) Details of Excretory systems in any of the groups (Is in later chapter) In general: – You are NOT responsible for definitions of terms or sections included in the text but which were not discussed in lecture – You are not responsible for the details of examples used in the text but not discussed in lecture. HOWEVER, these additional examples will help your understanding of concepts discussed and may be used on exams to test if you understand the general concepts. – You ARE responsible for material covered in lecture but not included in the readings...
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2014 for the course BIOLOGY 2011 taught by Professor Woo during the Fall '10 term at University of Central Florida.

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