Totalitarianism_Reflection (1).docx - Bandstra IB History 2020-21 Name Nishchay Tamrakar Date Period 1A Totalitarianism Reflection Using the text and

Totalitarianism_Reflection (1).docx - Bandstra IB History...

This preview shows page 1 out of 1 page.

Bandstra IB History 2020-21 Name: Nishchay Tamrakar Date: 8/25/20 Period: 1A Totalitarianism Reflection Using the text and discussion over John Stuart Mill’s quote, the excerpt from Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism , and Elie Wiesel’s Nobel Prize speech, reflect on how all three writers discuss the ability of a state, government, or group of people to come to power and oppress others. The one thing that all three writers have in common is their focus on the apathetic, silent majority. In Hannah Arendt’s excerpt from “The Origins of Totalitarianism”, she says that the Nazi movement in Germany recruited a large amount of their members from the mass of people who were in the eyes of political parties, too indifferent to get involved in politics. In order for there to be a totalitarian movement, there has to be a large amount of indifferent people who never make their voices heard in polls. Ellie Wiesel also says something along these lines in his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. He says that “Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim”.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture