TheOpiumWarsinChinaandBritishImperialism.docx - Name Date Period Westerners were especially irritated by the high custom duties(taxes the Chinese forced

TheOpiumWarsinChinaandBritishImperialism.docx - Name Date...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 2 pages.

Name: __ Date: __ Period: __ Westerners were especially irritated by the high custom duties (taxes) the Chinese forced them to pay and by the attempts of Chinese authorities to stop the growing import trade in opium. The drug had long been used to stop diarrhea, but in the seventeenth and eighteenth century people in all classes began to use it recreationally. Most opium came from Turkey or India, and in 1800 its import was forbidden by the imperial government. Despite this restriction, the opium trade continued to flourish. Privately owned vessels of many countries, including the United States, made huge profits from the growing number of Chinese addicts. The government in Peking noted that the foreigners seemed intent on dragging down the Chinese through the encouragement of opium addiction. When the Chinese insisted that Westerners pay all debts in the form of silver (which the westerners found increasingly more scarce), the Western nations had to find something they could sell to the Chinese in order to flip the balance of trade in their favor. The Chinese would buy the Opium from the British with silver and the British would turn around and use that silver to buy products it wanted. When the balance of trade turned against the Chinese in the 1830s, the British decided to force the issue of increased trade rights. The point of conflict was the opium trade. By the late 1830s more

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture