BME83 nylon Lab 2

BME83 nylon Lab 2 - Laboratory 2 Nylon Polymerization BME...

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Laboratory 2 – Nylon Polymerization BME 83L Section 02L Instructor: Prof. Monty Reichert T.A.: Nicole Bell Laboratory Performed on February 06, 2007 Nigel Chou Shijie
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Abstract In this laboratory the aim is to gain an appreciation of the process of polymerization and analyze the properties of polymer fibers produced. Nylon fibres were made by interfacial polymerization, in which an organic solution of sebacoyl chloride is added to an aqueous solution of hexanediamine in a beaker and nylon fibers are pulled from the interface between the two layers. The fibers produced are placed in a beaker of water to prevent coagulation, then laid out to dry on the bench. The nylon fibers produced, as well as other commercial fibers used as surgical suture materials, were tested for stress-strain behavior on a Tinius-Olson machine. A comparison was made between the properties of the fibers. The results showed that the fibers tested underwent predominantly elastic deformation, and that the modulus of elasticity as well as stress at failure of the nylon fibers produced was significantly smaller than the commercial fibres. This may be due to the differences in the process of synthesizing a polymer in the laboratory as compared to industrial processes. 1
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Introduction In this laboratory the purpose is to gain an understanding of the process of polymerization and how the stress-strain behavior of polymers is tested. We will also learn to analyse a polymer’s properties, such as tensile strength and elastic modulus. A nylon polymer will be synthesized by the process of interfacial polymerization and the resulting fibers will be subjected to tensile stress-strain tests. The same test will be used to measure the properties of other fibers that are commonly used as surgical suture materials. Through the tensile strength test, we will learn about the properties of the nylon polymer and compare them to those of the other fibers. The properties of these fibers can then be related to their biomedical application as suture materials. Nylon is one of the first commercially successful synthetic polymers and was introduced in the 1940s. Since then, it has been used in for a wide range of applications, including in medicine. One important biomedical application of Nylon is its use as a surgical suture material. Nylon is a nonabsorbable suture material, and thus is not easily hydrolysed by tissue enzyme digestion [4]. As such, it is used primarily for cutaneous wound closure [4], as it elicits minimal acute inflammatory reaction.[7] Nylon can also be used for deep closures as periostial suspension sutures, when long term retention of tensile strength is required.[4] Nylon is hydrolyzed slowly, but remaining suture material remains stable at 2 years, due to gradual encapsulation by fibrous connective tissue.[7] In terms of chemical structure, Nylon is a condensation polymer with its monomers joined by amide linkages. To form such a bond, an amino group(-NH 2 ) reacts with a carboxylic acid group
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This lab report was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course BME 83 taught by Professor Reichert during the Spring '07 term at Duke.

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BME83 nylon Lab 2 - Laboratory 2 Nylon Polymerization BME...

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