BME83 prosthetics Lab 1

BME83 prosthetics Lab 1 - Laboratory 1 Prosthetics BME 83L...

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Laboratory 1 – Prosthetics BME 83L Section 02L Instructor: Prof. Monty Reichert T.A.: Nicole Bell Lab partner: Ng Qi Sheng Laboratory Performed on January 23, 2007 Nigel Chou Shijie 1
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Abstract In this laboratory we aim to gain an appreciation the problems and issues associated with epithesis design by fabricating a simple prosthetic implant of a thumb made of Silicone rubber. Alginate was used to form a mould into which a mixture of Siliastic E RTV silicone rubber, curing agent and cure accelerator was poured. Upon solidification, a prosthetic thumb was formed which had a texture, weight, size and shape similar to an actual human thumb, but was white instead of skin-colored and less stiff. We conclude that that because of its similar properties, with further modification, it would be suitable as a rudimentary prosthetic to replace a human thumb. However, further considerations such as attachment to living tissue have to be made before it can be applied in a clinical setting. 2
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Introduction In this laboratory we explore the issues involved in the design of prosthetics. An epithesis, or prosthesis is essentially a device that is used to disguise a clearly visible mutilation.[6] It is usually an artificial replacement for a missing or damaged external body part, such as an ear or digit. The use prosthetics has a long history, and has advanced greatly from the days when the focus was merely artistic with little accompanying scientific basis [6] to the present, where materials are carefully selected based on their properties and more advanced methods for attachment of the prosthesis have been developed to give the patient maximum comfort. The biggest advances have been in the field of maxillofacial prosthetics, which refers to the use of prosthetics in the reconstruction of regions in the face, jaw and neck.[6] Apart from this field, prosthetics are also commonly used to replace amputated digits and limbs. Possibly the biggest problem facing the field of prosthetics is the attachment of the epithesis to living tissue. Non-permanent attachment methods, such as external retention mechanisms and adhesives [6], have never been fully satisfactory as the prosthesis can become dislodged or detached.[3] However, over the last few decades, a much more advanced permanent attachment method – osseointegrated Titanuim implants, has been developed and implemented successfully.[3] Osseointegration involves the formation of a direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of an artificial implant. Titanium is used because it is closely integrated with the surrounding bone tissue giving it a strong anchorage, and it does not cause any tissue reaction or inflammation in the skin.[3] Thus, Titanium fixtures can be implanted into bone with abutment posts penetrating the skin, and external prosthetics can be attached to the fixtures with clips or magnets. [5] In some cases fenestrations (openings or holes in the bone) have to be made to link fixture attachments.[3]
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BME83 prosthetics Lab 1 - Laboratory 1 Prosthetics BME 83L...

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