BME83 contactangle lab3

BME83 contactangle lab3 - Laboratory 3 Contact Angle BME...

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Laboratory 3 Contact Angle BME 83L Section 02L Instructor: Prof. Monty Reichert T.A.: Nicole Bell Laboratory Performed on February 27, 2007 Nigel Chou Shijie
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Abstract In this laboratory the aim is understand how surface energy can be estimated by calculating the contact angle using the Tantec Half-Angle TM method. Through this process we will gain an appreciation of the importance of surface energy in bioadhesion and how this affects the choice of materials in biomedical applications. The contact angle of water on various surfaces is measured using a Tantec CAM-MICRO Contact Angle Meter and compared the contact angle for each surface is compared. The relative hydrophilicity of each material was then evaluated, with a low contact angle indicating high hydrophilicity. The results showed that Polycaprolactone fibers which were coated with fibronectin were the most hydrophilic, followed by metallic surfaces. The most hydrophobic surfaces were those that were coated in wax. 1
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Introduction In this laboratory we use the Tantec Half-angle TM method with the Tantec CAM-MICRO Contact Angle Meter to determine the contact angle of water on various materials (listed in Table 1 of the results section). The contact angles calculated are then used to compare the relative surface energies and hydrophilicity of the materials. The purpose of doing so is to gain an appreciation of the importance of surface energy and adhesion properties, as estimated by contact angle, in the selection of materials for biomedical applications, such as implants and tissue engineering. Contact angle calculations have an important biomedical application in the measurement of the surface energy of a material and its bioadhesion properties. It has been shown that under certain conditions, the adhesion of a number of cell types such as bacteria, granulocytes and erythrocytes can be correlated with surface energy values estimated from contact angle measurements.[1] SInce contact angle measurement provides a simple and relatively inexpensive method to evaluate the relative bioadhesion of various materials, it is often used in research for evaluating surface energy of materials, and a cursory search in the PubMed database will show numerous studies in which contact angle is one of the techniques used in the study of surface properties. The bioadhesion properties of a material are an important consideration in most biomedical applications, with different applications requiring varying levels of bioadhesion. One application which requires high bioadhesion is tissue-engineering scaffolds, which would allow cells that are seeded onto the scaffold to be able to attach to the material and migrate through its pores, and organize into normal healthy tissue as the scaffold degrades.[2] Because of this, many tissue engineering scaffolds have extra-cellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin bound to their surface to improve bioadhesion. Some biomedical applications which require low protein and cell adhesion are vascular stents and vascular grafts. Their surfaces should have low bioadhesion
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course BME 83 taught by Professor Reichert during the Spring '07 term at Duke.

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BME83 contactangle lab3 - Laboratory 3 Contact Angle BME...

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