Kami Export - JAYONNA MONDESIR - Human Trafficking-1220L-ACT-Student(1) (1).pdf

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4©2013 PRINCIPLE WOODS, INC. Removal of copyright notice and copying are violations of Federal Law.Permission is NOT granted to copy for educational use, as consumable units of study are purchased per student.HIGH-INTEREST ARTICLEIn 1807, the Slave Trade Act was passed in the British Empire, eliminating the British slave trade. In 1863, theEmancipation Proclamation was issued in the United States to free slaves in the Confederacy. Thesemonumentalacts,championed by William Wilberforce and Abraham Lincoln respectively, led the way to abolish slavery altogether. At least,that’s what should’ve happened. Despite the freedom experienced by those protected under these laws, the passage ofthese laws was not the end of slavery in our world—not by a long shot. In fact, it isestimatedthat there are nearly 31million slaves in our world today, a number larger than the number of slaves freed by the laws passed to abolish slavery.And the number is only growing. But surely these slaves are all in other countries, right? They exist only inuncivilizednations—not in America, the land of the free and the home of the brave?False.Although slavery may sound like something otherworldly, something that happens only in war-torn, devastated, third-world nations far away, America is actually an international hub for a different kind of slave trade: a place where childrenand adults alike are bought and sold in black markets, out of the eyes of the public and law enforcement. And despitewhat the public hears about the sex slave trade, not all those sold into slavery are prostituted out. Human beings are alsosold into forced labor.Consider the story of Isabel—a native of Taiwan. At the age of 7, her mother sold her into slavery to make some money.She was sold to a Taiwanese family who took her in and eventually moved to a California suburb. However, despite hernew life in America, Isabel was far from free. She cooked and cleaned for her family, sleeping on the floor of the garagein their new home. She was regularly beaten for mistakes she made, and whenever she got hungry, she was fed only thescraps of whatever had spoiled or gone sour. Though we see this treatment as cruel, it is often culturally acceptable forparents of children to sell their children, male or female, into sex slavery or to prostitute them in order to make money. Asnoted in the traffickingdocumentaryNefarious: Merchant of Souls, some parents actually believe that their children owethem for being born.Other children enter the slave trade as victims of kidnapping. In 2009, the Entertainment Network aired a documentarycalledTHS Investigates: Teenage Trafficking. The documentary featured an interview with a now-19-year-old girl namedKimberly who, along with her cousin, had been trafficked at the age of 15. One rainy night the two girls were walking510152025
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Term
Spring
Professor
Clara Kirby

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