AP_FeudalnManoralism_docs-c98fa7-d358ff.docx - Feudalism and Manorialism(1.6 Read the following documents and answer the associated questions to analyze

AP_FeudalnManoralism_docs-c98fa7-d358ff.docx - Feudalism...

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Feudalism and Manorialism: (1.6) Read the following documents and answer the associated questions to analyze the function of Feudalism and manorialism in Europe. Document 1: Notes on a Feudal Oath F.A. Ogg, ecL, A Source Book of Medieval History (New York: American Book Company, 1907), 220-221. Reprinted in David Herlihy, ed., The History of Feudalism. (New York: Walker and Company, 1970), 97. To William, most illustrious duke of the Aquitanians; Bishop Fulbert, the favor of his prayers: Requested to write something regarding the character of fealty, I have set down briefly for you, on the authority of the books, the following things. He who takes the oath of fealty [faithfulness] to his lord ought always to keep in mind these six things: what is harmless, safe, honorable, useful, easy, and practicable. Harmless, which means that he ought not to injure his lord in his body; safe, that he should not injure him by betraying his confidence or the defenses upon which he depends for security; honorable, that he should not injure him in his justice, or in other matters that relate ,to his honor; useful, that he should not injure him in his property; easy, that he should not make difficult that which his lord can do easily; and practicable, that he should not make impossible for the lord that which is possible. However, while it is proper that the faithful vassal avoid these injuries, it is not for doing this alone that he deserves his holding: for it is not enough to refrain from wrongdoing, unless that which is good is done also. It remains, therefore, that in the same six things referred to above he should faithfully advise and aid his lord, if he wishes' to be regarded as worthy of his benefice and to be safe concerning the fealty which he has sworn. The lord also ought to act toward his faithful vassal in the same manner in all these things. And if he fails to do this, he will be rightfully regarded as guilty of bad faith, just as the former, if he should be found shirking, or willing to shirk, his obligations would be perfidious [treacherous] and perjured.

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