Ancient India - Harrapan and Indic Societies Group III By:...

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Harrapan and Indic Societies Group III By: Andrew Disner, Alex Jarocki, Paul Johnson, Herb Massey, Freddie Miller, Valerie Pulizzi and Simran Sharma
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Early Indian Civilization Origins of civilization date as far back as 5500 B.C.E. Settlers of the sub-continent immigrated from the foothills of Sind and Baluchistan (region north of the Arabian Sea). These early settlers cultivated wheat and barley and baked brick for dwellings and various buildings. As time endured another migratory group infiltrated the subcontinent, the Aryans. This group brought a reestablishment of culture, language, and religion.
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Geography Two rivers flow out the Himalayan Mountains. The Indus River, flows southwest to the Arabian Sea through the Indus River Valley. Being further to the west, this area was first settled upon. The Indus River Basin had fertile land that was easy to cultivate and easy to build on. The river basin created wonderful living conditions. However, floods and earthquakes were often a variable to surviving. The Ganges is the other river flowing southeast to the Bay of Bengel.
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Civilizations Early Indian Civilization is separated into two phases. Indus River Culture – The valley’s earliest urbanized civilization traced to as early as 2600 B.C.E. Vedic Aryan Civilization – dates back to 1500 B.C.E. ”Vedic,” comes from the name of their religious scriptures. “Aryan,” comes from the name of the nomadic group who migrated to the sub-continent. This civilization did not even last a thousand years.
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Thesis and Methodology Thesis Held responsible by the geography, early Indic history is a constant transition of migration and culture uniquely marked by religious texts, law, urbanization, religion, and an advanced economy. Methodology The primary sources for the Early Indus culture provide the knowledge necessary in understanding how unique and isolated the language is. The primary sources for the second phase of the culture, Vedic- Aryans serve as a reference to understand the moral compass and lifestyle of the civilization. Our secondary sources allowed us to fill in the cracks created by the un-deciphered writing system of the early Indus culture. As for the Vedic-Aryan culture, our secondary sources brought vast understanding of exactly how civilization originated and flourished in the sub- continent prior.
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People About? The most notable accomplishments: Innovative bronze tools, covered drainage systems, advanced social and economic organization, city layouts, and their own writing system. One remarkable characteristic of the Indic people was that of their thousand plus cities, everything from city layouts to architecture to building materials were completely consistent and constant over time. This meant all cities were
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Ancient India - Harrapan and Indic Societies Group III By:...

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