Lec21_Resources_2013-1

Lec21_Resources_2013-1 - The Water Planet Lecture 21...

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The Water Planet Lecture 21 Resources from the Earth Karen Bemis
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World population growth over past 500,000 years With the industrial age came a switch from linear growth to exponential growth.
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The growth of world population since 1950 There will be ~10,000 more people on Earth by the end of this lecture. 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Population in billions 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 Asia N.America Africa Note the large expansion in the population of the developing world after 1950
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Demographic transition model population growth rate = birth rate - death rate Current world population is about 7 billion with growth rate of about 1.8% per year total population birth rate death rate birth/death rate per 1000 total population 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
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Population growth scenarios for the next 50 years
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Sustainable Planet? Humanity is living beyond the sustainability of its environment. According to WWF, mankind currently consumes ~25% more natural resources than the Earth can produce. If humanity reaches 9.1 billion people by 2050, it will be using the biological capacity of two Earths.
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Minerals in every day life
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Material consumption per capita (USA vs. the world)
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Origin of mineral deposits Hydrothermal mineral deposits (e.g., Cu, Zn, Ag) Magma.c mineral deposits (e.g., Cr, Fe, Ni, V,Ti) Sedimentary minerals (e.g., NaCl, CaSO 4 , BIFs) Placers – high density mineral concentrated by flowing water along the shoreline (gold, plaHnum, zircon, diamonds) Residual mineral deposits – concentrated by chemical weathering processes (limonite=FeO±.O±; gibbsite=Al(O±) 3 ); bauxite is gibbsite-rich laterite
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Plate tectonics and mineral deposits
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Hydrothermal deposits
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Placer minerals
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ConIlict minerals
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Energy sources vs. consumption
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Lec21_Resources_2013-1 - The Water Planet Lecture 21...

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