Literary Terms - Allegory A story in which the characters...

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Allegory: A story in which the characters represent abstract qualities or ideas. For example, in westerns, the sheriff represents the good, and the outlaw represents evil.
Alliteration: The repetition of first consonants in a group of words as in “Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers.”
Allusion: A reference to something or someone often literary. For instance, if you were trying to instill confidence in a friend and said, “Use the force,” that would be an allusion to Stars Wars. The verb form of allusion is to allude.
Antagonist: A major character who opposes the protagonist in a story or play.
Archetype: A character who represents a certain type of person. For example, Daniel Boone is an archetype of the early American frontiersman.
Assonance: The repetition of vowel sounds as in “Days wane away.”
Atmosphere: The overall feeling of a work, which is related to tone and mood.
Blank verse: Unrhymed lines of poetry usually in iambic pentameter. Plenty of modern poetry is written in blank verse.
Characterization:The means by which an author establishes character. An author may directly describe the appearance and personality of character or show it through action or dialogue.
Climax: The point at which the action in a story or play reaches its emotional peak.
Conflict: The elements that create a plot. Traditionally, every plot is build from the most basic elements of a conflict and an eventual resolution. The conflict can be internal (within one character) or external (among or between characters, society, and/or nature).
Contrast: To explain how two things differ. To compare and contrast is to explain how two things are alike and how they are different.

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