Lab+2+HW - BioIILab PopulationGenetics,Evolution,...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 14 pages.

Bio II  LabPopulation Genetics, Evolution, & the Hardy-Weinberg EquilibriumLaboratory SynopsisIn this laboratory, you will use a physical model to examine simple biological situations where one of the Hardy-Weinberg conditions is not met and evolutionary change occurs. The results and conclusions from your simulation will be presented to your instructor.Laboratory Objectives1.  Define the terms population and gene pool, and relate them to the concept of evolutionary change.2. Explain the Hardy-Weinberg genetic equilibrium between allele frequencies and genotype frequencies and relate it to the expression (p + q)2 = p2 + 2pq + q3.  Describe the five conditions necessary for a population to be in Hardy-Weinberg genetic equilibrium.4.  Explain how the lab exercise models either meet or violate the necessary Hardy-Weinberg conditions.2.IntroductionThe process of evolutionary change occurs at the level of the population. A population is a group of interbreeding individuals located in the same area and separated physically from other populations of the same species. The genotypes of a population is called its gene pool and consists of all of the alleles present in the population members for all of the genes found in that species. Evolutionary change occurs when there is a measurable change in the population's genotype through time. The smallest unit of evolutionary change is an alteration in the allele frequencies for a single gene in the population through time. In 1908, G. H. Hardy and W. Weinberg independently showed that evolutionary change will only occur when certain conditions within a population are violated. If these conditions are not violated, genetic equilibrium will be maintained within the population.Hardy and Weinberg developed a model expressing the equilibrium between the allele frequencies for a single gene and the genotype frequencies among population members for that gene as an expansion of the binomial (p + q)2, or:1
We have textbook solutions for you!
/Biology-11th-Edition-9781337392938-379/
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 18 / Exercise 14
Biology
Martin/Solomon
Expert Verified
Bio II  Laballele genotypefrequencies           frequencies  (p + q)2      =            p2 + 2pq + q2For example, for a single gene with two allelic forms (and A), if you know that the population frequency of allele = 0.6 and A = 0.4, then you can say that = frequency of allele = 0.6= frequency of allele A = 0.4The Hardy and Weinberg model predicts that the genotype frequencies in a population can be estimated by the expression.p2 + 2pq + q2Specifically,p2= frequency of AA genotype = (0.6)2 = 0.362pq= frequency of AA genotype = 2 (0.6) (0.4) = 0.48q2 = frequency of AA genotype = (0.4)2 = 0.16Further, the Hardy–Weinberg model states that unless certain conditions are violated, these allele and genotype frequencies will be maintained through time (Figure 4.1).  The Hardy-Weinberg conditions are the following: 1.  No mutation2. No migration (including immigration or emigration) in the population. (no gene flow)3.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 14 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
Carlson,Mischel,Power
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Biology
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 18 / Exercise 14
Biology
Martin/Solomon
Expert Verified

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture