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W14 Music 160 Week 1 Lesson 3

W14 Music 160 Week 1 Lesson 3 - January8,2014 AdministraAon...

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Developing an American Sensibility Through Ballads January 8, 2014
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AdministraAon For those of you just joining us, here is the course website, where you can find the course syllabus hGps://catalyst.uw.edu/workspace/csunardi/17871/ Syllabus has informaAon about the course, requirements, and reading and listening assignments for each week Is also a required book—see syllabus for informaAon about this book
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Re: Add codes I am very sorry, but this class is nearly full. Please see David Aarons aRer class or email him about geSng on the wait list. [email protected] I will likely be teaching this class again during the summer (A‐term).
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Some musical terms Dynamics – volume, how loud or soR music is Timbre – sound quality, tone color InstrumentaAon – instruments (including voice) used in a parAcular selecAon of music (Wade 2009: 209) Singing style – way the voice is used OrnamentaAon – way a note is decorated
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For today… “Hearing” cultural values of an earlier America through BriAsh‐American ballads Thinking about how ballads changed in an American context Form – way the music is organized or structured
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From the BriAsh Isles to the American Colonies and….
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and expanding United States… SituaAng our thinking in the 17 th ‐19 th centuries, and beyond
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Cultural values communicated through ballads that have been handed down from earlier Ames: Restrained aStude towards sexuality and humans as sexual beings Adultery is a sin Emphasis on marriage and family Sense of austerity Sense that sinners are doomed in some way, oRen via death Sense of God’s will via nature and/or jusAce served in some way
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Some changes to BriAsh ballads as sung in America ORen omission of details that explicitly indicate that a woman has either had a baby or become impregnated outside of wedlock ORen omission of references to ghosts E.g., omission of interacAons between humans and ghosts Reflects a different aStude towards the supernatural world Ex: “PreGy Polly” as sung in America
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“PreGy Polly” (sung with banjo by Pete Steele) (E‐reserves Unit 1) “PreGy Polly, preGy Polly, come and go with me, PreGy Polly, preGy Polly, come and go with me, PreGy Polly, preGy Polly, come and go with me, Before we get married, some pleasure to see.” “PreGy Willie, preGy Willie, I fear yo’ way. PreGy Willie, preGy Willie, I fear yo’ way. PreGy Willie, preGy Willie, I fear yo’ way. You have taken my body all out astray.” (Banjo)
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He led her over the hills and the valleys so deep, He led her over the hills and the valleys so deep, He led her over the hills and the valleys so deep, And at last preGy Polly began to weep.
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