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W14 Music 160 Week 5 Lesson 1

W14 Music 160 Week 5 Lesson 1 - Culture&History...

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Star%ng to Think about Hawaiian Culture & History: Hawaiian Chant February 3, 2014
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Administra%on Thank you for a smooth midterm last Friday I will have more informa%on about when results will be ready later this week I am hoping to have the results ready by Friday (2/7) or Monday (2/10)
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On to Part II: Cultural Implica%ons of an Expanding United States
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For today: Hawaiian chant ( mele ) Means to understand indigenous Hawaiian culture and history Classifica%on of mele reflects stra%fica%on of Hawaiian society Importance of the words and concepts of sacred power Chant as history
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Some historical context As early as 650 A.D. (?) Polynesian seYlers arrive (perhaps earlier, perhaps later) 1778 – Bri%sh explorer Captain James Cook arrives to Hawai‘i; beginning of Western contact 1820 – American missionaries arrive
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1893 – Hawaiian monarchy overthrown (Queen Lili‘uokalani, right) 1894 – Republic of Hawai‘i established 1898 – U.S. annexes Hawai‘i as a territory 1959 – Hawai‘i becomes 50 th U.S. state
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Social classes (from highest to lowest) of indigenous Hawaiian society Ali‘i ‐ chiefs Kahuna Priests Specialists Maka‘ainana – commoners Kaua – slaves and untouchables
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Two concepts: Mana – sacred power Power that has a spiritual source and resides in all objects, humans, animals, nature, etc. Kapu – rituals and prohibi%ons The laws or regula%ons that govern interac%on and ac%vity to reinforce and preserve mana; taboos
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Thinking about tradi%onal Hawaiian music Mele (chant) as: An expression of life A form of communica%on between humans and the cosmos, or between humans A means by and through which to tell stories of an individual’s history, or genealogy A means by and through which to convey the history of Hawai‘i You Tube: Kumulipo Hawaiian Chant
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The text is poetry, called mele Mele – can refer to the chant itself because mele (or poetry) was always chanted The words are very important – most important part of the chant
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Kaona ‐ hidden meanings in mele
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