Austrlaian motor.docx - Australian Motor Industries...

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Australian Motor IndustriesAustralian Motor Industries Emblem.jpgEmblem featured on the sides of cars assembled by AMI during the 1960s and 1970sIndustryAutomotiveSuccessorToyota Motor Corporation (Australia)Founded1926Defunct1987FateBought out by ToyotaHeadquartersPort Melbourne, AustraliaAustralian Motor Industries (AMI) was an automobile assembly firm that was significant in theearly history of the automotive industry in Australia.Contents1Start of production2Reorganisation3Operations with AMC4Toyota and buyout5Notes6Further reading7External links
Start of productionThe Standard Vanguard was produced by AMI from 1958 to 1964The origins of Australian Motor Industries can be traced back to 1926 when J.F. Crosby decidedto invest in Eclipse Motors Pty Ltd of Melbourne.[1] In 1929 the company secured the Victorianagency for Standard Motor Company's cars, then changed the company name to Talbot andStandard Motors, and began a steady period of expansion with the Standard marque through the1930s. In 1952 the Crosby family formed a holding company, Standard Motor Products Ltd, inco-operation with the Standard Motor Company of England to assemble cars at a new assemblyplant in Port Melbourne. The subsidiary company responsible for vehicle assembly was theStandard Motor Company (Australia) Limited. It assembled the Standard Eight, Vanguard,Spacemaster and the Triumph Mayflower.[2]Import tariffs on vehicles encouraged the growth of the Australian vehicle body building industryfrom the early 1920s. The tax concessions varied with the degree of local content.Changes within the industry saw the consolidation of the principal manufacturers and the demiseof the smaller body builders. The Port Melbourne assembly plant was one of many new facilitieswhich were set up to meet the post war demand for new vehicles. By 1955 the assembly complexhad expanded to 33 acres (0.13 km2; 0.052 sq mi) of land and the new engine assembly plant hada capacity of 100 engines per eight-hour shift.Standard Motor Products Ltd was unusual in the Australian motor industry because of the highAustralian shareholding of the company; 88% in 1952 when the Australian company bought outits English partner.[3] The remaining shares were held by the Standard Motor Company (SMC).As a sign of the close co-operation between the two companies, SMC's Sir John Black was made
president and Arthur Crosby remained as chairman. His brother, Clive Crosby, became themanaging director. By 1956, the factory employed over 1,600 workers.When Leyland Motors, the new owners of Standard, indicated it wished to assume its ownproduction of Triumph cars in Australia, AMI needed to find another car to assemble. Theanswer came with Mercedes-Benz. In 1958 the company negotiated an agreement with Daimler-Benz to assemble and distribute Mercedes-Benz vehicles in Australia. In recognition of this newagreement the company was renamed Australian Motor Industries and a new subsidiary company

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Toyota Motor corporation, American Motors, Australian Motor Industries

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