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What is NMR Spectroscopy

What is NMR Spectroscopy - NMRSpectroscopy:DanielCoiro1 ,...

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NMR Spectroscopy: Daniel Coiro 1 What is NMR Spectroscopy? NMR is an acronym for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, a spectroscopic technique used in Chemistry and Biology to identify both small and large molecules based off of their atomic properties. Different NMR experiments can be conducted, to gather a range of information about your molecule. The most commonly used type of NMR used by organic chemists are proton ( 1 H) and carbon‐13 ( 13 C). While 1 H NMR ranges from 0‐12ppm, 13 C has a much broader range from 0‐220ppm. Chemical Shifts A chemical shift is the difference (ppm) between the resonance frequency of the proton being observed and that of trimethylsilane (TMS). A nucleus will be de‐shielded due the presence of electronegative atoms as well as the de‐saturation of a molecule. This will cause a greater chemical shift. This fact can be confirmed by the analysis of Figure 1, and Figure 2 for carbon 13, you should also know the trends for proton as well. Figure 1: Relative Chemical Shifts for 13 C NMR. Figure 2: Relative Chemical Shifts for 13 C NMR.
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2 1 H NMR: Spin-Spin Splitting Notice the J values increase as the internuclear distance between nuclei increases.
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