Feet plunge dive for food usually in groups external

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Unformatted text preview: ail • Superb fliers • Pluck food from surface • Pirates of the air • Obtain food, nest materials from other birds • Force regurgitation by harassing other birds • Small feet, poor swimmers • Hard time taking off from ocean surface • Plumage not waterproof Sulidae (boobies and gannets) • 10 species • Large oceanic seabirds • Heavy, pointed bill, thick neck • Streamlined, ventrally flattened body • Often have brightly colored feet • Plunge-dive for food, usually in groups • External nostrils are closed (breathe through mouth) Morus bassanus Blue-footed Booby Phalacrocoracidae (cormorants) • 36 species • Legs set far back, long hooked bill, long neck • Excellent swimmers, steering with tail and feet • Fill daily food requirement in as little as two 30 minute fishing trips Double crested cormorant Anhingidae (Anhinga & Darter) • 2 species • Tropical to warm temperate, fresh water • Slender body, long neck, long tail (“snakebird”) • Straight pointed bill, finely toothed edges • Plumage permeable to water • • Spend fair amount of time drying plumage by basking Stealth hunters • Slow movement under water • Neck held coiled, ready to dart forward to spear fish • • Modification of neck vertebrae to form special hinge for this purpose Excellent at soaring on thermals Red-billed Tropicbird Phaeothontidae (tropicbirds) • 3 species • In Pelecaniformes until 2004 (convergence) • Warm oceans in areas of tradewinds (topics...) • Medium-sized, stocky, streamlined • Two long tail feathers (streamers) with reduced barbs • Very poor locomotion on land • Curved, heavy, pointed bill with serrated edges • Spend entire lives at sea except when breeding • Plunge for fish and squid (alone or in small groups) • Breed at 3-4 years of age, life-long partnerships (male waits at nest site), aerial courtship • Nest is just a scrape, one egg Chicks semialtricial Hamerkop & Shoebill...
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2014 for the course BIO 340L taught by Professor Peterenglish during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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