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Unformatted text preview: LESSON: The Holocaust - History and Memory NAME: ______________________________________________ WORKSHEET: Virtual Field Trip Questions INSTRUCTIONS: For each scene in the virtual field trip, answer the questions below. HALL OF WITNESS 1. The Museum’s architect used structures and materials from Holocaust sites - including former camps - as inspiration for the Museum’s design. What building materials and structures do you see in this Hall? Mostly bricks 2. Does this space remind you of any buildings or places you’ve seen? How does it make you feel? I haven't seen a building like this before it looks very historical 3. What does the architecture suggest your Museum experience will be like? Does it remind you of anything you’ve studied or experienced? I've been to museums several times this one is going to be different THE JEWS OF EJSZYSZKI AND THE HOLOCAUST 1. How many Jews were killed in the Holocaust? 9 million 2. Which photos are you drawn to and why? How would you describe the people of Ejszyszki? Young girls in Ejszyszki entitled picture is the more brutal one because it shows how life was very good for the jews before the WWI. The people in that city I think they had very rich culture, traditions and family life. 3. Hundreds of years of Jewish civilization was annihilated during the Holocaust. How does getting a glimpse of life in one community help visitors understand the human losses? I think the setting in the museum is very emotional Virtual Field Trip Questions | 1 of 5 LESSON: The Holocaust - History and Memory NAME: ______________________________________________ WORKSHEET: Virtual Field Trip Questions KRISTALLNACHT: THE NIGHT OF BROKEN GLASS 1. What was Kristallnacht? Kristallnacht or the Night of Broken Glass, also called the November Pogrom, was a pogrom against Jews carried out by SA paramilitary forces and civilians throughout Nazi Germany on 9–10 November 1938. 2. Examine what the Nazis and their collaborators destroyed on Kristallnacht. How were these things important to the Jewish community? What message did their destruction convey? Nazi gangs destroyed hundreds of synagogues and more than 7,000 Jewish-owned businesses. Almost 30,000 Jews were arrested without charge and held in concentration camps and prisons 3. How do the photographs and artifacts displayed in the Museum illustrate what had changed for Jews in Germany as a result of Kristallnacht? They were released only if they agreed to leave Germany. GHETTOS: CONCENTRATION AND ISOLATION 1. What were Nazi ghettos? After invading Poland and later the Soviet Union, the Germans sought to isolate and control Jews by forcing them to live in marked-off, segregated sections of towns and cities they called "ghettos." 2. Why did the Nazis create a system of ghettos? What function did the ghettos serve? The Germans created at least 1,000 ghettos. Extreme overcrowding and hunger were common. Contagious diseases spread rapidly. 3. What do the artifacts and photographs in the Museum reveal about life, death and survival in the ghettos? Tens of thousands died in ghettos from illness, starvation, and cold. From 1942-1944, the Germans emptied the ghettos, deporting the Jews to camps and killing centers. Virtual Field Trip Questions | 2 of 5 LESSON: The Holocaust - History and Memory NAME: ______________________________________________ WORKSHEET: Virtual Field Trip Questions THE RAILCAR: DEPORTATION TO THE KILLING CENTERS 1. How do the railcar and historical photographs help visitors learn about the experiences of deportees? What were conditions like during deportations? Beginning in 1942, the Nazis systematically deported Jews in rail cars like this from across Europe and North Africa to killing centers in German-occupied Poland where they were murdered in gas chambers. 2. How were rail lines an important part of the process by which the Nazis and their collaborators annihilated European Jewry? There were five killing centers: Chelmno, Treblinka, Sobibor, Belzec, and Auschwitz-Birkenau. Auschwitz-Birkenau was the largest; the Germans and collaborators killed almost 1 million Jews there. 3. Countless people participated in the confiscation and auctioning of Jewish property, as well as the arrest and transport of millions to camps. Do they bear any responsibility for the Holocaust? No they didn't bear any responsibility for the Holocaust THE BARRACKS: CONDITIONS IN THE CAMPS 1. How do the artifacts and photos displayed here depict conditions in the camps? These sites served a range of purposes, including forced labor, detention of people thought to be “enemies of the state,” and mass murder. 2. How were concentration camps different from ghettos? Auschwitz was the largest of these camps. It included concentration, extermination, and forced-labor camps. In 1941, the SS ordered more than 250 pre-fabricated wooden barracks be shipped there. 3. What factors made it difficult for people to survive or escape from camps? You are standing inside a partially restored barrack building from that camp. Virtual Field Trip Questions | 3 of 5 LESSON: The Holocaust - History and Memory NAME: ______________________________________________ WORKSHEET: Virtual Field Trip Questions “FINAL SOLUTION”: KILLING CENTERS AND GAS CHAMBERS 1. The Nazis often deceived people to get them to do what they wanted. How did they deceive Jews into entering the gas chambers? This model of crematorium II at Auschwitz-Birkenau was sculpted by Mieczyslaw Stobierski based on contemporary documents and the trial testimonies of SS guards 2. Look closely at the model. What would have discouraged people from attempting to resist or escape? Most Jews deported to killing centers were killed in gas chambers soon after their arrival. 3. Look closely at the model. The artist carefully sculpted each person as an individual with their own story. What effect does this have? Why do you think he did this? The SS constructed four modern crematorium buildings at Auschwitz-Birkenau, each with a disrobing area, a large gas chamber disguised as showers and a cremation area with ovens. HALL OF REMEMBRANCE 1. How does the Museum memorialize victims of the Holocaust in this space? This memorial to Holocaust victims is a solemn, hexagonal space designed for public ceremonies and individual reflection. 2. Holocaust Survivor, Elie Wiesel, called the Museum a “living memorial,” warning, “a memorial unresponsive to the future would violate the memory of the past.” What does that mean to you? he walls are inscribed with names of concentration camps and killing centers, and are lined with candles which visitors may light 3. Why is it important for visitors to glimpse monuments to American democracy from the Hall of Remembrance? Narrow openings between the walls let in additional light and provide a glimpse of the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial. An eternal flame burns before an inscription from the Book of Deuteronomy about the importance of bearing witness Virtual Field Trip Questions | 4 of 5 LESSON: The Holocaust - History and Memory NAME: ______________________________________________ WORKSHEET: Virtual Field Trip Questions CONSERVATION LAB: RESCUING THE EVIDENCE 1. Why is it important to preserve collections related to the Holocaust? Why is it important to preserve the stories that go with the artifacts as well as the artifacts themselves? collections are treated to prevent their deterioration. 2. Many documents, photographs, and artifacts are of significance to individuals and their families. Why would it be important for the Museum to house them instead of remaining in people’s homes? The lab is equipped with specialized tools and climate-controlled environments to help preserve them. Each collection tells a unique and often personal story that enables us to better understand the Holocaust. 3. What can we learn from this collection about the challenges facing Jewish refugees trying to flee Nazi Germany in the late 1930s? They had very difficult times surviving in Germany Virtual Field Trip Questions | 5 of 5 ...
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