awakening_ca_guide.doc - The Awakening Critical Analysis...

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The Awakening Critical Analysis Guide Instructions : This guide will narrow your focused analysis of The Awakening , targeting an analysis of the function and effect of narrator, character, and figurative language. Follow the instructions for each as given below, and remember to provide ample commentary for each of your chosen quotations. Narrator's Point of View Choose three quotations from different parts of the book which demonstrate the three different types of narration found in The Awakening : Internal thoughts Descriptions of behavior Brief insights into both An example from the lesson has been completed for you. Chapter Quotation Commentary Chapter I "You are burnt beyond recognition," he added, looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage." The narrator uses a simile to describe Mr. Pontellier's expression as he examines his wife, comparing her to a piece of property. But we are not told specifically what he is thinking; the description of his expression gives us the information we need to discern his thoughts. This does, however, provide insight as to how he may perceive her; as something he owns? Chapter 6 The voice of the sea is seductive; never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation. Mrs. Pontellier was beginning to realize her position in the universe as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world within and about her. Chapter 10 But that night she was like the little tottering, stumbling, clutching Edna finally learns to swim. Her success is compared to that of a
child, who of a sudden realizes its powers, and walks for the first time alone, boldly and without over-confidence. young child learning to walk, highlighting that Edna is not a static character. Rather, Edna is at the beginning of an entirely new developmental stage. Chapter 14 That she was seeing with different eyes and making the acquaintance of new conditions in herself that colored and changed her environment, she did not yet suspect. Edna begins to look at the world and her own place within it differently. The narrator explains that at this moment in Edna’s awakening, she does not yet realize that the change comes from within herself, but she still accepts she exists in a new reality. Unlike other people around her, beholden to customs and societal norms, Edna has the courage to try to recreate the world around her in a way more pleasing to her sensibilities.

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