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Lecture Notes 9_Reactive

Lecture Notes 9_Reactive - 9 Capacitors and Inductors...

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9: Capacitors and Inductors 9: Capacitors and Inductors Capacitors Types of Capacitor Inductors Passive Components Series and Parallel Inductors Series and Parallel Capacitors Current/Voltage Continuity Average Current/Voltage Buck Converter Power and Energy Summary E1.1 Analysis of Circuits (2013-3717) Capacitors and Inductors: 9 – 1 / 12
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Capacitors 9: Capacitors and Inductors Capacitors Types of Capacitor Inductors Passive Components Series and Parallel Inductors Series and Parallel Capacitors Current/Voltage Continuity Average Current/Voltage Buck Converter Power and Energy Summary E1.1 Analysis of Circuits (2013-3717) Capacitors and Inductors: 9 – 2 / 12 A capacitor is formed from two conducting plates separated by a thin insulating layer. If a current i flows, positive change, q , will accumulate on the upper plate. To preserve charge neutrality, a balancing negative charge will be present on the lower plate.
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Capacitors 9: Capacitors and Inductors Capacitors Types of Capacitor Inductors Passive Components Series and Parallel Inductors Series and Parallel Capacitors Current/Voltage Continuity Average Current/Voltage Buck Converter Power and Energy Summary E1.1 Analysis of Circuits (2013-3717) Capacitors and Inductors: 9 – 2 / 12 A capacitor is formed from two conducting plates separated by a thin insulating layer. If a current i flows, positive change, q , will accumulate on the upper plate. To preserve charge neutrality, a balancing negative charge will be present on the lower plate. There will be a potential energy difference (or voltage v ) between the plates proportional to q . v = d Aepsilon1 q where A is the area of the plates, d is their separation and epsilon1 is the permittivity of the insulating layer ( epsilon1 0 = 8 . 85 pF / m for a vacuum).
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Capacitors 9: Capacitors and Inductors Capacitors Types of Capacitor Inductors Passive Components Series and Parallel Inductors Series and Parallel Capacitors Current/Voltage Continuity Average Current/Voltage Buck Converter Power and Energy Summary E1.1 Analysis of Circuits (2013-3717) Capacitors and Inductors: 9 – 2 / 12 A capacitor is formed from two conducting plates separated by a thin insulating layer. If a current i flows, positive change, q , will accumulate on the upper plate. To preserve charge neutrality, a balancing negative charge will be present on the lower plate. There will be a potential energy difference (or voltage v ) between the plates proportional to q . v = d Aepsilon1 q where A is the area of the plates, d is their separation and epsilon1 is the permittivity of the insulating layer ( epsilon1 0 = 8 . 85 pF / m for a vacuum).
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