Class syllabus 102 F13

Region of the em spectrum and demonstrate that visible

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Unformatted text preview: etermines whether or not you can remain in Chem 102 or if you should transfer into Chem 115 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Exam 2: Bonding Principles Unit 3: Chemical Reactions – An introduction Read Chapter 3, sections 3.8- 3.9, Chapter 6, Sections 6.1, 6.2 (pay attention to heat but ignore work and the 1st law of thermodynamics) and Chapter 8, section 8.8. • articulate the principle of conservation of matter and how balancing equations relates to that principle • balance the number of atoms in a chemical reaction on the reactant and product side • use the balanced chemical equation to compute the numbers of atoms or molecules produced or consumed in a chemical reaction • recognize the difference between potential and kinetic energy – know a couple of examples of potential energy – namely gravitational and electrostatic • write a clear statement defining the chemical potential energy • identify endo- or exothermic reactions from the vocabulary used in describing the reaction • state whether energy is released or required (absorbed) when a bond breaks or is formed • use a table of bond energies to compute the total energy change for a chemical reaction and to predict the thermicity (endo or exo) of a reaction Unit 4: Atomic Structure and Spectroscopy Read Chapter 7, sections 7.1- 7.13 (you have already seen some of this before so it should feel familiar) • use Coulomb’s law to describe the source of potential energy in atoms (electrostatic potential energy) and the energy of motion of the electrons. Ignore the energy of motion of the nucleus itself. • note that energy of the atom typically means the electrostatic potential energy and the kinetic energy of the electrons. • describe the failure of the classical model to explain the hydrogen atom’s stability • sketch the “orbitals” or “wavefunctions” of s, p, d, f electrons. • interpret orbitals as electronic density • identify the orbital subshell (s, p, d, f) from the picture of the orbital • relate the quantum number l to the orbital subshell notation (s, p, d, f). 5 Hunter College, CUNY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • interpret energy level diagrams and diagram the lowest energy state for different atoms recognize and determine the allowed quantum numbers for the n, l, ml numbers intepret radial distributions of electrons—relate radial nodes to relate the radial picture to “3d” or angular pictur...
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