Immigrants and Ethnic Differences

Fortin econ 560 lecture 4b o phase iv the quiet

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Unformatted text preview: tin – Econ 560 Lecture 4B o Phase IV, the "quiet revolution," began in the late 1970s to mid-1990’s: one driving force behind the revolution was the contraceptive innovation known as the pill, which enable young women to postpone marriage and they increased their investments in formal schooling The income and substitution effects of labor supply changed once again: women’s labor supply was no longer, and was influenced even less than before by husband’s earnings o (?) Phase V, the “opt-out” phenomena began in the mid-1990s: the growth in the participating rate of married mothers slowed and declined somewhat in the late 1990s and early 2000s, while the participation rate of single mothers expanded rapidly during the latter 1990s (in part in response to changes in policies (welfare, EITC)). Given the lower sensitivity of women’s labour supply to their husband’s income, another explanation may be a play. The case for the Pill revolution was also tested by Bailey (2006). Source: Goldin (1990) Source: Bailey (2005), United States Figure III .8 Age-specific labor-force participation rates, by cohort and age 1900-1970 1960 .7 1970 .6 1955 1950 .5 1930 .4 1940 1920 .3 1900 20 30 40 Age of cohort 50 60 Pre-1964 data are averaged over cohorts as in Smith and Ward (1985, Table 1). For instance, the participation rate for women ages 14 to 19 in 1950 is plotted in this figure as the cohort of 1930 at those ages. Data after 1963 represent participation rates for a single year of birth cohort at the reported age. Synthetic birth cohorts are computed by subtracting the reported age from the year of the survey. Bold lines depict the 1940 and 1955 cohorts. The March sample includes all women not in military or inmates ages 16 to 60. Source: 1964-2001 March CPS; for years before 1964, data is from Smith and Ward (1985, Table 1). S14 Nicole M. Fortin and Michael Huberman TABLE 1 Distribution of Female and Male Workforce, 1901–1961 Occupation Category 1901 1911 1921 1931 1941 1951 1961 Women White-collar Proprietary and managerial Professional Clerical Commercial and financial 23.6 1.2 14.7 5.3 2.4 29.9 1.6 12.5 9.1 6.7 47.9 2.0 19.0 18.5 8.4 45.4 1.6 17.7 17.7 8.4 44.6 2.0 15.6 18.3 8.7 55.4 3.0 14.4 27.4 10.6 57.4 2.9 15.6 28.6 10.3 Manual Manufacturing and mechanical Construction Labourers Transportation and communication 30.6 29.6 * 0.5 0.5 28.0 26.4 * 0.1 1.5 21.1 18.0 * 0.1 3.0 16.9 12.7 * 1.8 2.4 18.5 15.4 * 1.4 1.7 19.4 14.6 0.1 1.8 2.9 13.3 9.9 * 1.2 2.2 Service Personal Protective and other 42.0 42.0 * 37.6 37.5 0.1 27.0 26.0 1.0 34.0 33.9 0.1 34.4 34.3 0.1 21.3 21.1 0.2 22.5 22.2 0.3 3.8 – 4.5 – 3.7 0.3 3.7 * 2.3 0.2 2.8 1.1 4.3 2.5 Men White-collar Proprietary and managerial Professional Clerical Commercial and financial 14.1 4.8 3.1 2.9 3.3 14.8 5.0 2.4 3.0 4.4 21.0 8.2 2.9 4.7 5.2 20.2 6.4 3.7 4.4 5.7 20.4 6.2 4.5 4.5 5.2 25.8 8.8 5.4 6.0 5.6 31.4 9.8 7.9 6.9 6.8 Manual Manufacturing and mechanical Construction Labourers Transportation and communication 32.2 13.8 5.4 8.2 5.1 37.3 11.7 5.5 13.8...
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This document was uploaded on 02/26/2014 for the course ECON 560 at The University of British Columbia.

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