expos 1 - Cheng 0 This essay reworks my argument from using...

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Cheng 1 This essay reworks my argument from using eye imagery to deal with the concept of identity to going straight into identity without the use of eye imagery. The message has also been reworked to simply ask what the implications are of such a confusing portrayal of identity. I think my intro could use a little work, and I could have finished the Roy paragraph better but overall im pretty satisfied with how this paper turned out. Paragraph Map 1 Lays out the problem of confusing identity presented in the film. Proposes that we toss out questions of identity to deal with the film. 2 addresses contradictory ID in Tyrell, mainly that of all-knowing creator 3 brings up frail father figure in Tyrell and shows ID as an emotional guidance 4 addresses ID with Deckard, solves how we can relate to him though he is emotionless, etc. 5 addresses ID with Rachel, shows how her ID changes and what this means with love scene 6 addresses ID with Roy, depicts multiple ID’s in him. 7 finishes roy problem (not really) concludes stating how ID works with each character and how it is used in the film.
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Cheng 2 Essay 1 revise Technological Culture 10am Fielding 2/21/08 Confusion Abounds: The Role of Identity in Blade Runner 1 Viewers of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner will immediately notice that identity is one of the key concepts of the film, defining each character’s role while also pointing to questions which shed doubt on the same ideas it upholds. Many characters in the film embody this doubt by either portraying multiple identities at once or having their identities radically redefined as the movie progresses. This contradictory portrayal of identity is problematic because we normally see identity as something that is constant, defined, static. In this way, Blade Runner calls into question all of our traditional assumptions about identity right from the start. In the film, the simple use of replicants, artificial humans who are just as strong and smart as humans, poses a number of ambiguities concerning identity, and proposes the interesting question of whether or not a self-aware artificial construct can be defined as alive or as Rick Deckard puts it, “just tools”. This line is further blurred with the addition of a replicant who initially does not know of her manufactured upbringing, Rachel. If a replicant is emotionally responsive and has human memories, is it fair to still consider her a machine? How do we classify such a being? How then do we approach other characters as the blade runner, the creator of the replicants, and the outcast replicant leader? The traditional definition of identity and the questions it poses become so problematic that we must in fact toss them out completely in order to clearly and impartially see the implications of the actions and events that affect each character.
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Cheng 3 2 Perhaps the simplest and most apparent example of this conflict of identity is Tyrell. As the creator of the replicants, Tyrell is portrayed as an omnipotent god-like figure.
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expos 1 - Cheng 0 This essay reworks my argument from using...

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