Separation Process Principles- 2n - Seader & Henley - Solutions Manual

0270 kc3 003773 nc3 159 and nc3 190 with sse

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Unformatted text preview: ion with R2 = 0.972. For C3=, the Langmuir equation, with R2 = 0.986, is about the same goodness of fit as the Freundlich equation with R2 = 0.984. Considering both components, the Freundlich isotherm appears to be the best. However, as shown in the comparisons of the fits to the data (shown as markers) on the next page, the data, at the higher pressures, seems to be more in agreement with the asymptotic nature of the Langmuir isotherm. Probably, the Langmuir isotherm is best. For a given pressure, the amount adsorbed is greater for C3=, so it is more strongly adsorbed. Analysis: (a) (continued) Exercise 15.9 (continued) 2.5 q, Adsorbate, mmol/g 2.0 Propane adsorption 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 0 200 400 600 p, Pressure, torr 800 1000 3.0 Propylene adsorption q, Adsorbate, mmol/g 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 0 100 200 300 400 500 p, Pressure, torr 600 700 800 Exercise 15.9 (continued) Analysis: (continued) (b) Using the above pure component data fits, Eq. (15-32), the extended Langmuir isotherm becomes: ( qC3 )m K C3 pC3 2.5213(0.001853) pC3 For C3: qC 3 = = (1) 1+K C3 pC3 + K C3= pC3= 1+0.001853pC3 + 0.003916 pC3= For C3=: qC 3= = ( qC3= )m K C3= pC3= 1+K C3 pC3 + K C3= pC3= = 2.8201(0.003916) pC3= 1+0.001853pC3 + 0.003916 pC3= (2) Using a spreadsheet, Eqs. (1) and (2) are used to predict the millimoles of components adsorbed from the given mixture data at 25oC, where the partial pressures are computed from the given total pressure and vapor mole fractions by Dalton's law, pi = Pyi , and component adsorbate loadings are compared to the data using, qi = qtotal xi. The results are as follows, where for measured partial pressures, the measured loadings are compared to those predicted by the extended Langmuir isotherm using constants fitted from pure component adsorption data. Plots are shown on the following page, where the points are the experimental data. Experimental data: Predicted: Total p of C3, p of C3=, q of C3, q of C3=, q of C3, q of C3=, pressure, torr torr torr mmole/g mmole/g mmole/g mmole/g 769.20 760.90 767.80 761.00 753.60 766.30 754.00 753.60 754.00 760.00 760.00 760.00 188.07 227.51 310.19 403.33 401.89 410.43 462.96 468.74 471.40 568.48 681.26 699.96 581.13 533.39 457.61 357.67 351.71 355.87 291.04 284.86 282.60 191.52 78.74 60.04 0.237 0.519 0.607 0.575 0.717 0.614 0.709 1.027 1.192 1.219 0.504 0.572 1.960 1.494 1.445 1.466 1.246 1.353 1.265 0.824 0.509 0.467 1.489 0.854 0.242 0.303 0.430 0.599 0.601 0.608 0.722 0.734 0.739 0.947 1.238 1.291 1.771 1.678 1.501 1.255 1.244 1.246 1.072 1.054 1.047 0.754 0.338 0.262 From the above table and the plots on the following page, it is seen that the agreement is mostly poor. Analysis: (b) (continued) Exercise 15.9 (continued) 1.4 Propane adsorption from mixture q, Loading, mmol/g 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 p, Partial pressure, torr 2.5 q, Loading, mmol/g 2.0 1.5 1.0 Propylene adsorption from mixture 0.5 0.0 0 200 400 p, Partial pressure, torr 600 800 Exercise 15.9 (continued) Ana...
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This document was uploaded on 02/24/2014 for the course CBE 2124 at NYU Poly.

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