Separation Process Principles- 2n - Seader & Henley - Solutions Manual

4 does not give a choice from section 15 of perrys

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Unformatted text preview: tages. 2. Low head room, if much floor space is available. 3. Easy scale-up and certain performance. 4. Wide ratio of feed-to-solvent flow rates. Exercise 8.6 Subject: Selection of extraction device Given: 4,000 bbl/day of petroleum reformate. 5 volumes of diethyleneglycol to extract aromatics from the paraffins in one volume of reformate. 8 theoretical stages. Find: Preferred type of extractor using Tables 8.2 and 8.3, with Fig. 8.8. Analysis: Total throughput is 4,000 + 5(4,000) = 24,000 bbl/day. Assume 42 gal/bbl, which is equivalent to 0.159 m3/bbl. Then throughput = 24,000(0.159)/24 = 159 m3/h From Fig. 8.8, consider RDC, ARD, Kuhni, or Lurgi extractors. Exercise 8.7 Subject: Selection of extraction solvents. Given: The following mixtures: (a) water - ethyl alcohol (b) water - aniline (c) water - acetic acid Find: A possible solvent for each mixture and the resulting solute. Analysis: Use Table 8.4, where the minus sign designates a suitable solvent group. (a) water - ethyl alcohol: Solute Solute group Desired solvent group Possible solvent water Group 2 Group 1 no solvent to extract water ethyl alcohol Group 2 Group 1 n-butanol Solute water aniline (b) water - aniline: Solute group Group 2 Assume Group 5 with amine group controlling Desired solvent group Group 1 Groups 1 and 6 (c) water - acetic acid: Solute Solute group Desired solvent group water Group 2 Group 1 acetic acid Group 1 Groups 2,3.4.5 Possible solvent no solvent to extract water trichloroethane Possible solvent no solvent to extract water 2 - 1-butanol 3 - diisobutyl ketone 4 - methyl acetate 5 - isopropyl ether Note that it is very difficult to find a solvent to extract water from organic compounds. For that separation, adsorption may be preferred. Also, distillation is possible if the water is the more volatile component. Exercise 8.8 Subject: Selection of extraction solvents. Given: The following mixtures with solute first: (a) acetone - ethylene glycol (b) toluene - n-heptane (c) ethyl alcohol - glycerine Find: Suitable solvents Analysis: Use Table 8.4, where the minus sign designates a suitable solvent group. (a) acetone - ethylene glycol: Component Group Desired solvent group Possible solvent acetone (solute) 3 1 and 6 trichloroethane ethylene glycol 2 1 (b) toluene - n-heptane: Component Group Desired solvent group toluene (solute) 7 maybe 3,5,6 n-heptane 8 none (c) ethyl alcohol - glycerine: Component Group Desired solvent group ethyl alcohol 2 1 (solute) glycerine 1 Possible solvent aniline Possible solvent Table 8.4 does not give a choice. From Section 15 of Perry's Handbook, possible solvents are benzene and carbon tetrachloride. Exercise 8.9 Subject: Characteristics of the extraction of acetic acid (A) from a dilute solution in water (C), with ethyl acetate (S) at 25oC. Given: Values or estimates of values of (KA)D , (KC)D , (KS)D , and βAC. Find: If the system exhibits (a) high selectivity, (b) high solvent capacity, and (c) ease of recovery of solvent. A better solvent. Analysis: Use CHEMCAD with UNIFAC for LLE to obtain typical mass fraction compositions for two liquid phases in equilibrium at 25oC and 1 atm. The LLVF three-phase flash model gives the...
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