{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

ESS 106 Lecture 05 June 2013

ESS 106 Lecture 05 June 2013 - Living with Volcanoes Living...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Living with Volcanoes
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Living with Volcanoes Cascade Volcanoes Supervolcanoes (!) Yellowstone Gas / Climatic effects of Volcanism Age dating Extraterrestrial volcanoes Exam is cumulative (~1/2 old material)
Image of page 2
Moving on to the Cascades - Juan de Fuca Plate Trench
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Evolution of the Olympic and Cascade Ranges
Image of page 4
Cascade Arc Red indicates volcanic rock that is < 2.5 million years old Quaternary Period Note that, in places, the Quaternary arc is broadly distributed and overlapping central Cascades Other places: single nodes characterize quaternary arc northern Cascades Yellow: “Back Arc” volcanoes
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Volcanoes/
Image of page 6
Individual Volcanoes You do not need to memorize all the information about each of the individual volcanoes That information is simply for your own edification as citizens of the Pacific Northwest (or Cascadia, if you rather)
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Lowdown Many types of volcanoes in the Cascades Stratocones Shields Monogenetic cinder cones Lava fields Major Cascade volcanoes are spaced. Seems to be ~50 km apart for the big boys However, this doesn’t hold up under real scrutiny Large swaths of the pacific northwest are covered with recently erupted volcanoes Stratocones are long-lived lifetimes can be >1 million years Cascade stratocones are, in general, ~300,000 to ~1.2 million years old Stratocones are COMPOSITE in nature and grow in spurts Times of growth separated by long periods of NO growth Built up incrementally. Collapse. Build again.
Image of page 8
Many types of volcanoes in the Cascades Stratocones Shields Monogenetic cinder cones Lava fields Major Cascade volcanoes are spaced. Seems to be ~50 km apart for the big boys However, this doesn’t hold up under real scrutiny Large swaths of the pacific northwest are covered with recently erupted volcanoes Stratocones are long-lived lifetimes can be >1 million years Cascade stratocones are, in general, ~300,000 to ~1.2 million years old Stratocones are COMPOSITE in nature and grow in spurts Times of growth separated by long periods of NO growth Built up incrementally. Collapse. Build again. The Cascades Lowdown
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
± LAHARS from Mt Rainier constitute the greatest volcano hazard in the Cascade range ² USGS Special report 98-428 The Lowdown: Hazards
Image of page 10
Supervolcanoes!
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
545 mi 3 57 mi 3 145 mi 3 240 mi 3 Supereruptions Volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 8 Short-term, explosive events that eject magma with a mass of 10 15 kg – which is 11 trillion tons of magma! Produce pyroclastic deposits with volumes of 1000 km 3 A ± supervolcano ² is a volcano that has produced at least one explosive supereruption Destructive capacity far greater then smaller explosive eruptions 19 th Century Eruptions 20 th Century Eruptions Prehistoric Eruptions Yellowstone 2.1 Ma Yellowstone 1.3 Ma Long Valley 0.76 Ma Yellowstone 0.54 Ma 12 mi 3 Tambora 1815 2.4 mi 3 Krakatau 1883 0.1 mi 3 MSH 1980 1.2 mi 3 Pinatubo 1991
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern