eng162wpaper3thecathedral-2 - 1 Angelone Alexa Angelone Professor Zino English 162W May 1 2011 Unknowingly Understanding Without comprehending the

eng162wpaper3thecathedral-2 - 1 Angelone Alexa Angelone...

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1 Angelone Alexa Angelone Professor Zino English 162W May 1, 2011 Unknowingly Understanding Without comprehending the purposes of objects, people cannot explain what it is that they are truly seeing. They are unable to see past the physical features of the object and therefore cannot see the true symbolism that the object holds sacred. These objects, when put together, can occupy a place; what was once called space. Yi-Fu Tuan, in his book titled Space and Place: The Perspective of Experience, explains how we use our surroundings as an influence on our behavior. Tuan suggests that, “When space feels thoroughly familiar to us, it has become place” (73). Spaces, after being carefully filled, become a specific place in which people can be comfortable. Often, if we are lucky enough, we can experience our spaces and places through each of our five senses; seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling, and tasting. People who have all five properly working senses can often take for granted what it is they truly have. In one of Raymond Carver’s stories, Cathedral, he creates two important characters, one of which is blind. As a blind man, Robert must compensate his blindness with the other four senses, but even still, he can understand the true meaning of objects without seeing them because, according to Tuan, seeing puts you at a greater distance of you and the object. Another character, the nameless husband and narrator, does not see what the physical features of objects, nor
2 does he make any attempt to, until meeting Robert. As the story progresses and although he does not realize it, the narrator, with the navigation of Robert, has an epiphany and has learned to see past the surface of objects and people. My former high school, St. Francis Prep, in New York, was built in its present location in 1974. Before this location in Queens, in 1858, St. Francis Academy, which it was called back then, opened for the very first time. The school relocated once more before moving to Queens, New York. Because, this chapel is in a school, there is one door to enter it. “The construction of a cathedral aroused the enthusiasm of a broad community of believers”, according to Tuan (105). They claim this church to be designed for worshippers and I, along with many other people, are glad they did build this marvelous chapel. Once you walk through the doors, there are many objects that may not be familiar to people who do not care about or understand. The structure of buildings in spaces and places that we reside in or visit greatly affect the way we think and feel. Cathedrals and churches most often have high ceilings. Tuan states that, “In an empty cathedral, the sounds of footsteps tapping sharply on the stone floor creates an impression of cavernous vastness” (14). Sounds, according to Tuan, can convey the size of the cathedral. The first thing I notice is the extremely high ceiling, but this is not a specific feature to a church or cathedral.

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