ACOM340_Chapter8

Socialimplicationsof disease

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Unformatted text preview: leave patient in “anguish of spirit” about Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré illness Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Drawbacks to harmony Can be difficult to evaluate and measure; might produce gradual and ambiguous results If immediate results are needed, harmony may be difficult to use; hospital or doctor may be necessary Overall, perspectives are not at odds with each other; each may be appropriate in different situations, sometimes both Health care teams partner together for what’s best for patient Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Social Implications of Disease Cultural assumptions guide interpretation For example, death may be glorious or tragic, illness may be seen as unfair or opportunity Difficult to make sense of disease Many times, public reactions not based on facts, but fears or cultural assumptions Various social effects of diseases on how health and illness are examined within cultural beliefs Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Disease as Curse Blaming someone is a way to make sense of illness Inflicted by Gods or witches Bubonic plague in the 14th century killed more than 1/3 of population; blamed on witches, many of whom were killed Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Some African tribes blame AIDS on work of witches; death occurs naturally only in old age, so anything else is blamed on witches The Goba believe that a person may be a witch and not even know it; if something happens to a young person, family hires a witch finder to find witch who is responsible Overall, some believe in supernatural forces and will withhold medical treatment if they believe it will interfere with religion Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Stigma of Disease Type of social rejection in which the stigmatized person is treated as dishonorable or is ignored altogether People many times must choose between two forms of isolation Keep diagnosis (e.g., HIV) a secret (eschewing potential support) Tell others and risk being shunned and avoided Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Effect of stigma is that individuality is overshadowed by discrediting characteristic People are not treat...
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This document was uploaded on 02/24/2014 for the course ACOM 340 at SUNY Albany.

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