ACOM340_Chapter8

Victimization peopledonotlikebeing

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Unformatted text preview: ed as humans, but more like a label Disease is more than physical: people are embarrassed, afraid, and too ashamed to seek care due to stigma Others are secretive due to retribution Some people do not get evaluated for fear of being stigmatized due to results Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. The Morality of Prevention News is filled with health warnings Information enables people to make healthy choices, enhancing one’s well­being Prevention can work to a point, but taken too far it may lead to prejudice against ill persons One backlash of prevention is that people believe illness is a result of laziness or indifference People should not be criticized for becoming ill; sometimes people fall ill even though they have lived well Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Victimization People do not like being called victims who have survived a disease and continue to live People do not want the disease to victimize them People like to be called survivors Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Patient and Caregiver Roles Role: set of expectations that applies to people performing various functions in a culture Guided by culturally approved rules Typically one role exists in relation to another (e.g., patient­caregiver) A role may lose meaning without its counterpart Can sometimes force people to play roles they would rather not assume Roles are collaborative, supported by participants’ mutual efforts Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Popular Cultural Roles Mechanics (Caregivers) and Machines (Patients) Limited emotional communication Focus on physical and objective Advantage is reducing emotional drain on physicians; patients’ confidence of being “fixed” Patients may feel like set of parts Communicating About Health, Third Edition, du Pré Copyright © 2010 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Parents (Caregivers) and Children (Patients) Parallels paternalism Patients expected to “obey;” some cultures carry this to extreme and show respect Many South Africans and Asians show respect and agree with anything doctor says even if they do not understand or have reservatio...
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This document was uploaded on 02/24/2014 for the course ACOM 340 at SUNY Albany.

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