week4history

week4history - I say that there is no change. He uses a 7...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Logan Millen Thoughts on Atwater articles Medical Profession in a New Society: The first thing I noticed was that Atwater says “that professional standards and status were high in the early years of the 19 th century and they declined thereafter.” I don’t know if he means just in the 19 th century, and if he does, that’s true. But he doesn’t end his argument, and I would disagree with him since doctors today are much higher in status and standards than before. He also says “there was early excellence of professional training which was not sustained.” I disagree with this because in the time of 1811-1860, and any other time, medical sciences were progressing all the time. He states that “by 1834, 70% of all those people listed in the 1827 directory had either died or moved elsewhere. This mobility gradually and steadily decreased so that by 1865 only 50% of those present in 1860 had moved away.”
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: I say that there is no change. He uses a 7 year gap, 1827 to 1834, which is a rate to 10% per year. Then he uses a 5 year gap, and since the number is 50%, the rate is still 10%. He is wrong. He says that “it was the last third of the 19 th century which saw their fullest development,” which disagrees with his earlier implications that doctors deteriorated throughout the century. Physicians of Rochester: The first thing I noticed is he says “50% of them doctors,” and the bad grammar makes him lose his professionalism and credibility. He didn’t actually make many claims in this article, just said that academy involvement became more prominent. My overall thoughts of these articles are that they are very dry, although they do contribute to our research....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course HIST 0507.469.0 taught by Professor Nystrom during the Spring '08 term at RIT.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online