awakening_ca_guide.doc - The Awakening Critical Analysis...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

The Awakening Critical Analysis Guide Instructions : This guide will narrow your focused analysis of The Awakening , targeting an analysis of the function and effect of narrator, character, and figurative language. Follow the instructions for each as given below, and remember to provide ample commentary for each of your chosen quotations. Narrator's Point of View Choose three quotations from different parts of the book which demonstrate the three different types of narration found in The Awakening : Internal thoughts Descriptions of behavior Brief insights into both An example from the lesson has been completed for you. Chapter Quotation Commentary Chapter I "You are burnt beyond recognition," he added, looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage." The narrator uses a simile to describe Mr. Pontellier's expression as he examines his wife, comparing her to a piece of property. But we are not told specifically what he is thinking; the description of his expression gives us the information we need to discern his thoughts. This does, however, provide insight as to how he may perceive her; as something he owns? Chapter VI In short, Mrs. Pontellier was beginning to realize her position in the universe as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world within and about her. This may seem like a ponderous weight of wisdom to descend upon the soul of a young The narrator explains what Edna Pontellier was going through detail and sympathizes with her. We learn, in extreme details, the thoughts and opinions that gradually change within her.
woman of twenty-eight— perhaps more wisdom than the Holy Ghost is usually pleased to vouchsafe to any woman. Chapter I Mr. Pontellier finally lit a cigar and began to smoke, letting the paper drag idly from his hand. He fixed his gaze upon a white sunshade that was advancing at snail’s pace from the beach. He could see it plainly between the gaunt trunks of the water- oaks and across the stretch of yellow camomile. The actions the character took were described very carefully, but the narrator gave away no hints to what Mr. Pontellier was thinking as he did these actions.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture