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Unformatted text preview: on with the assessments that followed. NOTE: Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. Score differences were not found to be statistically significant at age 9 in 1973, 1986, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1999, 2004, 2008, and 2012; at age 13 in 1973, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1992, 1999, 2004 (revised assessment format), and 2012; and at age 17 in 1999. Extrapolated data2 Original assessment format Revised assessment format SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1973–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 41 P UBLIC/CATHOLIC SCHOOL GAPS Score gap between public and Catholic school students widens at age 17 Information about the type of school students attend was first collected for the long-term trend mathematics assessment in 1978. In most assessment years since then, Catholic school students have had higher average scores than public school students. In 2012, Catholic school students scored 7 to 20 points higher on average than public school students across the three age groups (figure 30). Both public and Catholic school students scored higher in 2012 than in 1978 at all three ages. Shortterm gains from 2008 were only seen for 13-year-old students in public schools and 17-year-old students in Catholic schools. In the case of 17-year-olds, the increase for Catholic school students led to a widening of the score gap. This report presents results only for public and Catholic school students because private school participation rates overall fell below the required standard for reporting results in 2012. (See the Technical Notes for more information.) Figure 30. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students, by type of school Age 9 Age 13 See notes at end of figure. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1978–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. 4 2 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD PUBLIC/CATHOLIC SCHOOL GAPS Figure 30. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students, by type of school—Continued Age 17 The score gap between 17-year-old Catholic and public school students widened 10 points since 1978. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. NOTE: Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. Results are not shown for private schools because the participation rate for private schools did not meet the minimum participation guidelines for reporting in 2012. At age 17, results are not shown for Catholic schools in 1996 and 2004 (original and revised assessment formats) because the participation rates for Catholic schools did not meet the minimum participation guidelines for reporting. Score differences were not found to be statistically significant...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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