significantly different p 05 from 2012 1 typical

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Unformatted text preview: als because of rounding. Nine-, 13-, and 17-year-olds who were in the grade typical for their age scored higher on average in 2012 than students who were in a lower grade (figure 15). The sample sizes in 2012 for 9- and 13-year-olds in grades higher than the grade typical for their age were too small to allow reporting on their performance. Scores were higher in 2012 than in 1971 for 9- and 13-year-olds at or below their typical grade. The trend results at age 17 were mixed. Seventeen-year-olds who were in 10th grade or below had a higher aver­ age score in 2012 than in 1971, whereas 17-year-olds in the twelfth grade had a lower score. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1971–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. 2 2 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD G RADE AT TENDED Figure 15. Trend in NAEP reading average scores for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students, by grade attended Age 9 Age 13 Age 17 Seventeen-yearolds in twelfth grade scored 12 points lower than in 1971. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. Typical grade for age group. NOTE: Trend results are not shown for 9-year-olds in 5th grade or above, or for 13-year-olds in 9th grade or above, because reporting standards were not met for all of the assessment years. 1 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1971–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 2 3 R EADING FOR FUN Students who frequently read for fun score higher Results from previous NAEP reading assessments show students who read for fun more frequently had higher average scores. Results from the 2012 long-term trend assessment also reflect this pattern. At all three ages, students who reported reading for fun almost daily or once or twice a week scored higher than did students who reported reading for fun a few times a year or less (figure 16). P Figure 16.  ercentage of students and average scores in NAEP reading for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-olds, by how often they read for fun on their own time: 2012 Age 9 Age 13 See note at end of figure. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessment. 24 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD R EADING FOR FUN Figure 16. Percentage of students and average scores in NAEP reading for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-olds, by how often they read for fun on their own time: 2012—Continued Age 17 NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessment. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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