Education's Report Card

significantly different p 05 from 2012 source us

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: nd Mathematics Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 4 5 C OURSETAKING Thirteen-year-olds taking a regular mathematics course score lower than those taking algebra Implicit in the recent push for higher academic standards is the hope that more challenging coursework will prepare students for their future education and careers. Information about coursetaking collected as part of the long-term trend mathematics assessment reflects some movement in that direction. Thirteen-year-olds were asked, “What kind of mathematics are you taking this year?” and were given the following five response options: • I am not taking mathematics this year • Regular mathematics • Pre-algebra • Algebra • Other As might be expected, students engaging in more challenging mathematics coursework tend to perform higher than those taking lower level courses. In 2012, students taking a regular mathematics course scored lower on average than those who reported taking pre-algebra or algebra (figure 32). Students taking algebra also scored higher than those taking pre-algebra. Figure 32. Percentage of students and average scores in NAEP mathematics for 13-year-olds, by type of mathematics taken during the school year: 2012 NOTE: An average score is not shown for students who selected the “not taking mathematics” response because the sample size was insufficient to permit a reliable estimate. Detail may not sum to totals because results are not shown for students who reported not taking mathematics. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessment. 4 6 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD COURSETAKING Percentage of 13-year-olds taking algebra increasing NAEP first collected information on mathematics coursetaking at age 13 in 1986. Since that time, the percentage of 13-year-olds taking algebra has doubled and the percentage taking pre-algebra has also increased (figure 33). NCES recently released Algebra I and Geometry Curricula: Results From the 2005 High School Transcript Mathematics Curriculum Study. This study explored differences in the content of algebra I and geometry courses. The study also examined the accuracy of school course titles and descriptions in relation to the rigor of what is taught in algebra I and geometry. The results of the study are available at http:/ /nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/hsts/math_curriculum/. Figure 33. Trend in percentage of 13-year-old students assessed in NAEP mathematics, by type of mathematics taken during the school year # Rounds to zero. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. NOTE: Results for 1986–2004 are from the original assessment format, and results for 2008 and 2012 are from the revised assessment format (2004 revised assessment format results are not available). Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP),...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online