At age 17 results are not shown for catholic schools

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Unformatted text preview: at age 9 in 1990 and 2004 (original assessment format), at age 13 in 1986, and at age 17 in 1990 and 1999. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1978–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 4 3 PARENTAL EDUCATION Thirteen- and 17-year-olds whose parents did not finish high school score higher than in 1978 Students participating in the long-term trend assessment responded to a short section of background questions that included questions about the highest level of education completed by their parents. Students selected one of five response options for each parent: • Did not finish high school • Graduated from high school • Some education after high school • Graduated from college • Don’t know Results are presented for the highest level of education for either parent. Nine-year-olds were not asked the question because they are often unsure about their parents’ education level. Students whose parents have completed higher levels of education generally score higher than those whose parents completed lower levels. In 2012, both 13- and 17-year-olds who reported their parents either did not finish high school or graduated from high school scored lower on average than students reporting higher levels of parental education. Furthermore, students whose parents graduated from college scored higher than those reporting lower levels of parental education. Thirteen-year-olds made long-term gains from 1978 regardless of the highest level of education they reported for their parents (figure 31). The only short-term gain from 2008 was made by 13-year-olds who indicated that at least one parent graduated from college. At age 17, the average score decreased from 2008 to 2012 for students who reported that high school graduation was the highest level of education completed by either parent. Figure 31. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores for 13- and 17-year-old students, by highest level of parental education Age 13 Thirteen-yearolds whose parents did not finish high school scored 21 points higher than in 1978. See note at end of figure. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1978–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. 4 4 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD PARENTAL EDUCATION Figure 31.  rend in NAEP mathematics average scores for 13- and 17-year-old students, by highest level T of parental education—Continued Age 17 Seventeen-yearolds whose parents did not finish high school scored 10 points higher than in 1978. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1978–2012 Long-Term Tre...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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