Education's Report Card

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Unformatted text preview: various years, 1986–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 4 7 C OURSETAKING Seventeen-year-olds taking calculus score higher Seventeen-year-olds were asked, “Counting what you are taking now, have you ever taken any of the following mathematics courses?” The highest level mathematics course was determined based on students’ selections from the following responses: • General, business, or consumer mathematics • Pre-algebra or introduction to algebra • First-year algebra • Second-year algebra • Geometry • Trigonometry • Pre-calculus or calculus As with the pattern at age 13, the more rigorous the coursework, the higher the average mathematics score for 17-year-olds (figure 34). In 2012, students who had taken pre-calculus or calculus scored higher on average than students who selected any of the other options as the highest level course taken. Second-year algebra or trigonometry was the highest mathematics course reported by over one-half of 17-year-olds; the average score for these students was higher than the scores for students who reported taking other courses, with the exception of pre-calculus or calculus. The average score for students whose highest level course was pre-algebra or general mathematics was lower than the scores for students taking any of the other courses. Figure 34. Percentage of students and average scores in NAEP mathematics for 17-year-olds, by highest level mathematics course ever taken: 2012 NOTE: The “pre-algebra or general mathematics” response category includes “pre-algebra or introduction to algebra,” “general, business, or consumer mathematics,” and students who did not take any of the listed courses. The “other” response category includes students for whom the highest level mathematics course could not be determined due to missing or inconsistent responses. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessment. 4 8 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD COURSETAKING Percentage of 17-year-olds taking calculus increasing The percentage of 17-year-olds taking pre-calculus or calculus more than tripled from 1978 to 2012 (figure 35). The percentage of students whose highest level mathematics course was second-year algebra or trigonometry also increased in comparison to 1978. Figure 35. Trend in percentage of 17-year-old students assessed in NAEP mathematics, by highest level mathematics course ever taken * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. NOTE: The “pre-algebra or general mathematics” response category includes “pre-algebra or introduction to algebra,” “general, business, or consumer mathematics,” and students who did not take any of the listed courses. The “other” response category includes students for whom the highest level mathematics course could not be determined due t...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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