Hispanic students made a 32 point gain but this was

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: d Black 9-year-old students The White – Black score gap narrowed 10 points since 1973. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Extrapolated data adjusting for the limited number of questions from the 1973 mathematics assessment in common with the assessments that followed. NOTE: Black includes African American. Race categories exclude Hispanic origin. Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. Figure 24. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for White and Hispanic 9-year-old students * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Extrapolated data adjusting for the limited number of questions from the 1973 mathematics assessment in common with the assessments that followed. NOTE: White excludes students of Hispanic origin. Hispanic includes Latino. Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1973–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. 3 8 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD RACIAL/ETHNIC GAPS Racial/ethnic score gaps narrow at age 13 Both the White – Black and White – Hispanic gaps narrowed from 1973 at age 13 (figures 25 and 26). Black and Hispanic students both made larger gains from the 1970s than White students, leading to a narrowing of the score gaps in 2012. Figure 25. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for White and Black 13-year-old students The White – Black score gap narrowed 18 points since 1973. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Extrapolated data adjusting for the limited number of questions from the 1973 mathematics assessment in common with the assessments that followed. NOTE: Black includes African American. Race categories exclude Hispanic origin. Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. Figure 26. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for White and Hispanic 13-year-old students The White – Hispanic score gap narrowed 14 points since 1973. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Extrapolated data adjusting for the limited number of questions from the 1973 mathematics assessment in common with the assessments that followed. NOTE: White excludes students of Hispanic origin. Hispanic includes Latino. Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1973–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 3 9 R ACIAL/ETHNIC GAPS White, Black, and Hispanic 17-year-olds show improvement since the 1970s White – Black and White – Hispanic gaps narrowed at age 17 because Black and Hispanic students made larger gains from 1973 than White students (figures 27 and 28). Averag...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online