Education's Report Card

In this case only public school 13 year olds made

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Unformatted text preview: es and score gaps for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students, by type of school Age 9 Age 13 See notes at end of figure. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1980–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. 20 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD P UBLIC/CATHOLIC SCHOOL GAPS Figure 14. Trend in NAEP reading average scores and score gaps for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students, by type of school—Continued Age 17 * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. NOTE: Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. Results are not shown for private schools because the participation rate for private schools did not meet the minimum participation guidelines for reporting in 2012. At age 17, results are not shown for Catholic schools in 1996 and 2004 (original and revised assessment formats) because the participation rates for Catholic schools did not meet the minimum participation guidelines for reporting. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1980–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 21 G RADE AT TENDED Percentages of students in a grade below the one typical for their age increase The long-term trend assessments are administered to samples of students defined by age rather than by grade. Nine-year-olds are typically in fourth grade, 13-year-olds are typically in eighth grade, and 17-year­ olds are typically in eleventh grade. Some students in each age group, however, are in a grade that is below or above the grade that is typical for their age. For example, some 17-year-olds are in the tenth or twelfth grade rather than the eleventh grade. Different factors may contribute to why students are in a lower or higher grade than is typical for their age. Such factors could include students having started school a year earlier or later than usual, having been held back a grade, or having skipped a grade. For each of the three age groups, the percentage of students below the grade typical for their age was larger in 2012 than in 1971 (table 1). At age 17, the percentage of students in twelfth grade was smaller in 2012 than in 1971. Table 1. Percentage of students assessed in NAEP reading, by age group and grade attended: Various years, 1971–2012 Age group and grade attended 1971 1975 1980 1984 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1999 2004 2008 2012 Age 9 3rd grade or below 24* 23* 28* 34* 37 42* 43* 40* 33* 30* 36 38 37 4th grade 75* 76* 72* 66* 63 58* 57* 60* 67* 69* 63 62 63 1* 1* #* #* 1 # # # # # # # # 7th grade or below 28* 28* 28* 35* 39 39 43* 44* 38 38 38 41 39 8th grade 71* 72* 71* 64* 61 60 56* 56* 61 62 62 59 60 1 1 1 # 1 # 1 # # # # # 1 14* 15* 14* 21 24 26* 28* 29* 32* 33* 25 26* 23 73 73 77* 70* 65* 65* 64* 63* 61* 63* 71 70* 73 13* 12* 9* 9* 12* 9* 8* 7* 7* 4 4 4 4 1 5th grade or above Age 13 1 9th grade or above Age 17 10th grade or below 11th grade 12th grade 1 # Rounds to zero. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Typical grade for age group. NOTE: Results for 1971–99 are from the original assessment format, and results for 2004–12 are from the revised assessment format. Detail may not sum to tot...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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