Education's Report Card

Source us department of education institute of

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Unformatted text preview: 2012 2 5 R EADING FOR FUN Smaller percentages of 13- and 17-year-olds read for fun About the same percentage of 9-year-olds reported reading for fun daily in 2012 as in 1984 when this question was first asked (figure 17). For 13- and 17-year-old students, however, the percentages have decreased. Figure 17.  rend in percentage of 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students assessed in NAEP reading T who reported that they read for fun on their own time almost every day Age 9 Age 13 See notes at end of figure. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1984–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. 26 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD R EADING FOR FUN Figure 17.  rend in percentage of 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students assessed in NAEP reading T who reported that they read for fun on their own time almost every day—Continued Age 17 * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. NOTE: Results for 1984–2004 are from the original assessment format, and results for 2008 and 2012 are from the revised assessment format (2004 revised assessment results are not available). In general, higher percentages of White students than Black and Hispanic students reported in 2012 that they read for fun almost daily (table 2). The one exception was at age 9 where there was no significant difference in the percentages of White and Hispanic students reading for fun almost daily. At ages 13 and 17, smaller percentages of White, Black, and Hispanic students reported reading for fun almost daily in 2012 as compared to 1984. At age 9, only the percentage of Black students was smaller. Table 2.  ercentage of students assessed in NAEP reading who reported that they read for fun on their own P time almost every day, by age group and selected race/ethnicity categories: Various years, 1984–2012 Age group and race/ethnicity 1984 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1999 2004 2008 2012 White 53 54 54 57 57 54 52 53 48* 53 Black 55* 58 54 55 59* 53 57 51 43 47 Hispanic 51 47 51 51 59 52 56 57 46* 52 White 35* 37* 38* 36 37* 32 29 31 28 30 Black 34* 37* 31 36 17 31 33 26 23 23 Hispanic 32* ‡ 21 ‡ 18 29 19 26 19 18 White 31* 28* 35* 29* 33* 24 25 25 22 22 Black 31* 35* 20 15 16 21 22 14 19 17 Hispanic 26* ‡ ‡ ‡ 13 20 ‡ 17 15 15 Age 9 Age 13 Age 17 ‡ Reporting standards not met. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. NOTE: Results for 1984–2004 are from the original assessment format, and results for 2008 and 2012 are from the revised assessment format (2004 revised assessment format results are not available). Black includes African American, and Hispanic includes Latino. Race categories exclude Hispanic origin. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1984–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 27 M ATHEMATI...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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