Trends in academic progress 2012 3 9 r acialethnic

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Unformatted text preview: e mathematics scores for 17-yearolds increased 4 points from the first assessment year for White students, 18 points for Black students, and 17 points for Hispanic students. The changing makeup of the student population is one reason why the overall average score for 17-year-olds has not changed significantly even though student groups within the overall population are making gains. When an increase in the proportion of typically lower performing students is accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of higher performing students, the overall average score can remain unchanged even though the average scores for both higher and lower performing groups increase. This phenomenon is known as Simpson’s paradox. Figure 27. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for White and Black 17-year-old students The White – Black score gap narrowed 14 points since 1973. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Extrapolated data adjusting for the limited number of questions from the 1973 mathematics assessment in common with the assessments that followed. NOTE: Black includes African American. Race categories exclude Hispanic origin. Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. Figure 28. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for White and Hispanic 17-year-old students The White – Hispanic score gap narrowed 14 points since 1973. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Extrapolated data adjusting for the limited number of questions from the 1973 mathematics assessment in common with the assessments that followed. NOTE: White excludes students of Hispanic origin. Hispanic includes Latino. Score gaps are calculated based on differences between unrounded average scores. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1973–2012 Long-Term Trend Mathematics Assessments. 4 0 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD GENDER GAPS Gender gap for 17-year-olds narrows from 1973 The 2012 reading results show female students scoring higher on average than male students at all three ages, but this is not the case in mathematics. In 2012, there were no significant gender gaps in mathematics at ages 9 and 13 (figure 29 At age 17, male students scored higher in mathematics than female students. ). The gender gap in 2012 at age 17, however, was narrower than in 1973 due to the increase in the average score for female students. Figure 29. Trend in NAEP mathematics average scores and score gaps for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students, by gender Age 9 Age 13 Age 17 The gender gap narrowed 4 points since 1973. # Rounds to zero. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. 1 Negative numbers indicate that the average score for male students was lower than the score for female students. 2 Extrapolated data adjusting for the limited number of questions from the 1973 mathematics assessment in comm...
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