There is a pattern across all three age groups of

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Unformatted text preview: GE SCORES Nine- and 13-year-olds make long-term gains The national trend in reading shows improvement at ages 9 and 13. Students in both age groups scored higher in 2012 than did students their age in 1971 (figure 2). Seventeen-year-olds did not show improvement. The average reading score in 2012 for 17-year-olds was not significantly different from the score in 1971. Figure 2. Trend in NAEP reading average scores for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students Thirteen-year-olds were the only age group to make score gains from 2008 to 2012. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1971–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 7 P ERCENTILE SCORES Lower, middle, and higher performing 9-year-olds make long-term gains Percentile results provide information on which students are making progress. For example, changes in the scores of students performing at different percentiles indicate if overall trends are being driven by lower or higher performing students. In 2012, the score increase for 9-year-olds in comparison to 1971 was evident at all five percentiles reported (figure 3). Larger gains were made by lower and middle performing students at the 10th, 25th, and 50th percentiles than by those at higher percentiles. Figure 3. Trend in NAEP reading percentile scores for 9-year-old students Scores for students at the 10th and 25th percentiles were 19 points higher than in 1971. * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1971–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments. 8 THE NATION’S REPORT CARD I TEM MAP What 9-year-olds know and can do in reading The item map below illustrates a range of reading behaviors associated with scores on the longterm trend reading scale. The cut scores for the three performance levels reported at age 9 are highlighted in boxes on the scale. The descriptions of selected assessment questions indicate what students need to do to receive credit for a correct answer. For example, 9-year-olds with a score of 201 were likely to be able to connect explicit details to recognize the main idea of an expository passage. Age 9 NAEP Reading Item Map Scale score 500 // 296 289 278 271 266 255 253 Question description Infer the meaning of a supporting idea in a biographical sketch (MC - ages 13 and 17) Generalize from details to recognize the meaning of a description (MC - ages 13 and 17) Recognize a sequence of supporting details in a story excerpt (MC - age 13) Interpret story details to recognize what happened (MC - age 13) Recognize the main purpose of an expository passage (MC) Recognize the main idea of instructions (MC - ages 13 and 17) Retrieve and provide relevant information about the subject of a biographical sketch (CR - ages 13 and 17) 250 244 240 237 231 228 221 214 209 209 202 201 Locate and recognize a fact in an expository passage (MC - age 13) Recognize the similarity between two story characters (MC - ages 13 and 17) Infer the characters’ feelings based on the story dialogue (MC - age 13) Make an inference to recognize generalization of the main topic (MC) Recognize the main topic of a short paragraph (MC)...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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