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Unformatted text preview: hoto #22287838; © Miodrag Gajic/iStockphoto #18721338; © kate_sept2004/iStockphoto #8841468; © Comstock Images/Getty Images #78429269; © EHStock/ iStockphoto #4123700; © Alejandro Rivera/iStockphoto #23150645 E XECUTIVE SUMMARY Figure A. Trend in NAEP reading and mathematics average scores for 9-, 13-, and 17-year-old students Reading Mathematics * Significantly different (p < .05) from 2012. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), various years, 1971–2012 Long-Term Trend Reading and Mathematics Assessments. TRENDS IN ACADEMIC PROGRESS 2012 1 E XECUTIVE SUMMARY Racial/ethnic and gender gaps narrow Closing achievement gaps is a goal of both national and state education policy. The results from the 2012 NAEP long-term trend assessments show some progress toward meeting that goal. The narrowing of the White – Black and White – Hispanic score gaps in reading and mathematics from the 1970s is the result of larger gains by Black and Hispanic students than White students. Only the White – Hispanic gap in mathematics at age 9 has not shown a significant change from the early 1970s. Female students scored higher in reading than male students at all three ages. The 2012 results show 9-year-old males making larger score gains than females. This has led to a narrowing of the gender gap at age 9 as compared to 1971. In mathematics, male 17-year-old students scored higher than female students. The gender gap at age 17 narrowed because female students made gains from 1971 to 2012, but 17-year-old male students did not. Reading Score changes from 1971 Score changes from 2008 Characteristic Age 9 Age 13 Age 17 Age 9 Age 13 Age 17 All students Race/ethnicity White Black Hispanic1 Gender Male Female Score gaps White – Black White – Hispanic Female – Male 13 8 3 15 36 25 9 24 17 4 30 21 7 17 10 9 6 4 3 Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Mathematics Score changes from 1973 Score changes from 2008 Characteristic Age 9 Age 13 Age 17 Age 9 Age 13 Age 17 All students Race/ethnicity White Black Hispanic Gender Male Female Score gaps White – Black White – Hispanic Male – Female2 25 19 4 27 36 32 19 36 32 4 18 17 26 24 21 17 3 5 Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Narrowed Reading results for Hispanic students were first available in 1975. Therefore, the results shown in the 1971 section for Hispanic students are from the 1975 assessment. 2 Score differences between male and female students in mathematics were not found to be statistically significant (p < .05) at age 9 in 1973, 2008, or 2012, and at age 13 in 1973 and 2012. NOTE: Black includes African American, and Hispanic includes Latino. Race categories exclude Hispanic origin. 1 Indicates score was higher in 2012 Indicates no significant change in 2012 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, Nati...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014.

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