Fast Food Nation

decided to sponsor bozos circus a local childrens

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Unformatted text preview: ties together into one cheerful, friendly, patriotic idea. Ray Kroc could only dream, during McDonald’s tough early years, of having such marketing tools at his disposal. He was forced to rely instead on his wits, his charisma, and his instinct for promotion. Kroc believed completely in whatever he sold and pitched McDonald’s franchises with an almost religious fervor. He also knew a few things about publicity, having auditioned talent for a Chicago radio station in the 1920s and performed in nightclubs for years. Kroc hired a publicity firm led by a gag writer and a former MGM road manager to get McDonald’s into the news. Children would be the new restaurant chain’s target customers. The McDonald brothers had aimed for a family crowd, and now Kroc improved and refined their marketing strategy. He’d picked the right moment. America was in the middle of a baby boom; the number of children had soared in the decade after World War II. Kroc wanted to create a safe, clean, all-American place for kids. The McDonald’s franchise agreement required every new restaurant to fly the Stars and Stripes. Kroc understood that how he sold food was just...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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