Fast Food Nation

A memo sought to explain the underlying psychology

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Unformatted text preview: bout having given Disney greater control over how their joint promotions would be run. “A lot of people can’t get used to the fact that two big global brands with this kind of credibility can forge this kind of working relationship,” a McDonald’s executive told a reporter. “It’s about their theme parks, their next movie, their characters, their videos… It’s bigger than a hamburger. It’s about the integration of our two brands, long-term.” The life’s work of Walt Disney and Ray Kroc had come full-circle, uniting in perfect synergy. McDonald’s began to sell its hamburgers and french fries at Disney’s theme parks. The ethos of McDonaldland and of Disneyland, never far apart, have finally become one. Now you can buy a Happy Meal at the Happiest Place on Earth. the brand essence THE BEST INSIGHT INTO the thinking of fast food marketers comes from their own words. Confidential documents from a recent McDonald’s advertising campaign give a clear sense of how the restaurant chain views its customers. The McDonald’s Corporation was facing a long list of problems. “Sales are decreasing,” one memo noted. “People are telling us Burger King and Wendy’s are doing a better job of giving… better food at the best pri...
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