Fast Food Nation

He looked at the restaurant through the eyes of a

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Unformatted text preview: powdered instant beverages called “Malt-a-Plenty” and “Shake-a-Plenty,” a gadget that could dispense whipped cream or shaving lather, square ice cream scoops, and a collapsible table-and-bench combination called “Fold-a-Nook” that retreated into the wall like a Murphy bed. The main problem with square scoops of ice cream, he found, was that they slid off the plate when you tried to eat them. Kroc used the same basic technique to sell all these things: he tailored his pitch to fit the buyer’s tastes. Despite one setback after another, he kept at it, always convinced that success was just around the corner. “If you believe in it, and you believe in it hard,” Kroc later told audiences, “it’s impossible to fail. I don’t care what it is — you can get it!” Ray Kroc was selling milk-shake mixers in 1954 when he first visited the new McDonald’s Self-Service Restaurant in San Bernardino. The McDonald brothers were two of his best customers. The Multimixer unit that Kroc sold...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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