Fast Food Nation

In 1917 the two men had both lied about their ages to

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Unformatted text preview: could make five milk shakes at once. He wondered why the McDonald brothers needed eight of the machines. Kroc had visited a lot of restaurant kitchens, out on the road, demonstrating the Multimixer — and had never seen anything like the Mc-Donald’s Speedee Service System. “When I saw it,” he later wrote, “I felt like some latter-day Newton who’d just had an Idaho potato caromed off his skull.” He looked at the restaurant “through the eyes of a salesman” and envisioned putting a McDonald’s at busy intersections all across the land. Richard and “Mac” McDonald were less ambitious. They were clearing $100,000 a year in profits from the restaurant, a huge sum in those days. They already owned a big house and three Cadillacs. They didn’t like to travel. They’d recently refused an offer from the Carnation Milk Company, which thought that opening more McDonald’s would increase the sales of milk shakes. Nevertheless, Kroc convinced the brothers to sell him the right to franchise McDonald’s nationwide. The two could stay at home, while Kroc traveled the country, making them even richer. A deal was signed. Years later Richard McDonald described his first memory of Kroc, a mo...
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