Fast Food Nation

Kirbys first pig stand was in texas but the chain

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Unformatted text preview: ives who had secretly plotted and carried out the destruction of America’s light rail network were fined $1 each. And the postwar reign of the automobile proceeded without much further challenge. The nation’s car culture reached its height in southern California, inspiring innovations such as the world’s first motel and the first drive-in bank. A new form of eating place emerged. “People with cars are so lazy they don’t want to get out of them to eat!” said Jesse G. Kirby, the founder of an early drive-in restaurant chain. Kirby’s first “Pig Stand” was in Texas, but the chain soon thrived in Los Angeles, alongside countless other food stands offering “curb service.” In the rest of the United States, drive-ins were usually a seasonal phenomenon, closing at the end of every summer. In southern California, it felt like summer all year long, the drive-ins never closed, and a whole new industry was born. The southern California drive-in restaurants of the early 1940s tended to be gaudy and round, topped with pylons, towers, and flashing signs. The...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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