Fast Food Nation

Ninety percent of those fries are purchased at fast

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Unformatted text preview: feeding the leftover potato scraps to his cattle. He was thirty-six years old. After the war, Simplot invested heavily in frozen food technology, betting that it would provide the meals of the future. Clarence Birds-eye had patented a number of techniques for flash-freezing in the 1920s. But sales of Birdseye’s new products were hampered, among other things, by the fact that few American grocery stores, and even fewer households, owned a freezer. The sales of refrigerators, freezers, and other kitchen appliances soared after World War II. The 1950s soon became “the Golden Age of Food Processing,” in the words of historian Harvey Levenstein, a decade in which one marvelous innovation after another promised to simplify the lives of American housewives: frozen orange juice, frozen TV dinners, the Chicken-of-Tomorrow, “Potato salad from a package!”, Cheese Whiz, Jell-O salads, Jet-Puffed Marshmallows, Miracle Whip. Depression-era scarcity gave way to a cornucopia of new foods on the shelves of new suburban supermarkets. Ad campaigns...
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