Fast Food Nation

The main problem with square scoops of ice cream he

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: rgest corporations. walt and ray RAY KROC TOOK THE McDonald brothers’ Speedee Service System and spread it nationwide, creating a fast food empire. Although he founded a company that came to symbolize corporate America, Kroc was never a buttoned-down corporate type. He was a former jazz musician who’d played at speakeasies — and at a bordello, on at least one occasion — during Prohibition. He was a charming, funny, and indefatigable traveling salesman who endured many years of disappointment, a Willy Loman who finally managed to hit it big in his early sixties. Kroc grew up in Oak Park, Illinois, not far from Chicago. His father worked for Western Union. As a high school freshman, Ray Kroc discovered the joys of selling while employed at his uncle’s soda fountain. “That was where I learned you could influence people with a smile and enthusiasm,” Kroc recalled in his autobiography, Grinding It Out, “and sell them a sundae when what they’d come for was a cup of coffee.” Over the years, Kroc sold coffee beans, sheet music, paper cups, Florida real estate,...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online