Fast Food Nation

The wars effect on the state in the words of

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Unformatted text preview: late into the night, cleaning the bathrooms and mopping the floors. Once a week, he prepared the “special sauce” for his hamburgers, making it in huge kettles on the back porch of his house, stirring it with a stick and then pouring it into one-gallon jugs. After World War II, business soared at Carl’s Drive-In Barbeque, along with the economy of southern California. The oil business and the film business had thrived in Los Angeles during the 1920s and 1930s. But it was World War II that transformed southern California into the most important economic region in the West. The war’s effect on the state, in the words of historian Carey McWilliams, was a “fabulous boom.” Between 1940 and 1945, the federal government spent nearly $20 billion in California, mainly in and around Los Angeles, building airplane factories and steel mills, military bases and port facilities. During those six years, federal spending was responsible for nearly half of the personal income in southern California...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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